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Ethical Philosophy Selector

Discussion in 'Online Tests' started by BlinkandThink, Mar 4, 2010.

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  1. BlinkandThink

    BlinkandThink Community Member

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    1. Jeremy Bentham (100%)
    2. Jean-Paul Sartre (89%)
    3.
    Epicureans (86%)
    4. Kant (79%)
    5. John Stuart Mill (76%)



    Bentham, Jeremy (1748-1832) [FONT=Arial, Helvetica]
    [/FONT]
    • [FONT=Arial, Helvetica] Nature has placed humans under two states: pain and pleasure. [/FONT]
    • [FONT=Arial, Helvetica] The words right and wrong are significant only when related to the Utilitarian principle. [/FONT]
    • [FONT=Arial, Helvetica] Pleasures are not distinguished by quality; pleasure has quantifiable value. [/FONT]

    Jean-Paul Sartre (1905-1980) [FONT=Arial, Helvetica]
    [/FONT]
    • [FONT=Arial, Helvetica] When we choose something, we affirm the value of our choice because we have chosen it above other choices [/FONT]
    • [FONT=Arial, Helvetica] When we choose something for ourselves, we should choose it for all people. [/FONT]
    • [FONT=Arial, Helvetica] We must be consistent in our interpretations of moral situations regardless of whom the agent is. [/FONT]
    • [FONT=Arial, Helvetica] Logic cannot help us specific situations [/FONT]
    • [FONT=Arial, Helvetica] Making conscious moral choices is more significant than consistently following moral guidelines [/FONT]
    • [FONT=Arial, Helvetica] The conflict between the interests of two people is in the end, irresolvable [/FONT]

    Epicureanism
    Epicurus (341-270 BC) - Greek founder of Epicureanism
    [FONT=Arial, Helvetica]
    [/FONT]
    • [FONT=Arial, Helvetica] Pleasure is the ultimate moral end [/FONT]
    • [FONT=Arial, Helvetica] Dynamic (passionate) pleasures are bad, passive (mild) pleasures are good [/FONT]
    • [FONT=Arial, Helvetica] The end result of pleasure is what is significant [/FONT]

    Immanuel Kant (1724-1804) [FONT=Arial, Helvetica]
    [/FONT]
    • [FONT=Arial, Helvetica] We can make a prior judgments; the negation of such judgments would a logical absurdity because a priori knowledge is known without sensory data. [/FONT]
    • [FONT=Arial, Helvetica] We combine a priori and a posteriori knowledge to [/FONT]
    • [FONT=Arial, Helvetica] We have freedom [/FONT]
    • [FONT=Arial, Helvetica] God is not essential for his moral argumentation [/FONT]
    • [FONT=Arial, Helvetica] The objective facts about the human knowledge leads to Kant's morality [/FONT]
    • [FONT=Arial, Helvetica] We must act ought of a sense of duty in order to be moral [/FONT]
    • [FONT=Arial, Helvetica] Moral action does not come out of following inclinations [/FONT]
    • [FONT=Arial, Helvetica] Moral standards must be followed without qualification [/FONT]
    • [FONT=Arial, Helvetica] We must always act so that the means of our actions could be a universal law [/FONT]
    • [FONT=Arial, Helvetica] We must always treat people as ends not means [/FONT]

    Mill, John Stuart (1806-1873) [FONT=Arial, Helvetica]
    [/FONT]
    • [FONT=Arial, Helvetica] The Utilitarian principle is correct when the quality of pleasures is accounted for [/FONT]
    • [FONT=Arial, Helvetica] Liberty is the most important pleasure [/FONT]


    :m168:


    http://www.selectsmart.com/PHILOSOPHY/
     
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    #1 BlinkandThink, Mar 4, 2010
    Last edited: Mar 4, 2010
  2. Raccoon Love

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    1. Aquinas (100%)
    2. Aristotle (76%)
    3. Spinoza (75%)
    4. Stoics (73%)
    5. Nietzsche (70%)
    6. Cynics (62%)
    7. David Hume (57%)
    8. St. Augustine (56%)
    9. Thomas Hobbes (56%)
    10. Epicureans (54%)
    11. Plato (54%)
    12. Jean-Paul Sartre (53%)
    13. Nel Noddings (53%)
    14. Ockham (53%)
    15. Ayn Rand (48%)
    16. Jeremy Bentham (48%)
    17. John Stuart Mill (42%)
    18. Kant (37%)
    19. Prescriptivism (3%)

    Aquinas (1225 or '27-1274)
    [FONT=Arial, Helvetica]
    All life has a purpose
    Meeting this purpose allows one to be happy.
    Happiness is to be found in the love of God.
    God's grace providing entrance into heaven creates the highest form of human happiness.
    Short of heaven, a person can achieve a more limited form of happiness through a life of virtue and friendship.
    Morality is not determined by the arbitrary will of God.
    Morality is derived from human nature and the activities that are objectively suited to it.
    The difference between right and wrong can be appreciated through the use of reason and reflection.
    Religious reflection may supplement the use of reason and reflection to determine right from wrong.
    Societies must enact laws to ensure the correct application of moral reasoning.
    Human nature is good because God made it good.

    [/FONT]Aristotle (384 BC-322 BC)
    [FONT=Arial, Helvetica]
    The life of virtue is rewarding for the individual and the community.
    The essence of a thing does not exist independent of the thing.
    There is no completely universal idea of "the good."
    There is an individualized ideal form for all living things.
    In living in accordance with their true nature, humans will find the most enjoyment out of reasoning.
    An investigation of human nature can reveal how humans ought to act.
    Humans have a pre-defined purpose.
    People can have variations on the best way to exist in order to meet their purpose.
    The mean between the extremes of any given characteristic is the ideal.
    The rule of the "Golden Mean" is not to be applied mechanically
    Aristotle discusses having practical knowledge as being able to have the right means to one's action and the right ends
    [/FONT]
    Spinoza, Baruch (later known as Benedictus)
    (1632-1677)

    [FONT=Arial, Helvetica]
    Determinist
    Something must have a desirable affect on man in order to be good
    Must understand determinism of the world

    [/FONT]
     
    #2 Raccoon Love, Mar 4, 2010
    Last edited: Mar 4, 2010
  3. Reon

    Reon Midnight's Garden

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    I took this test on another site, my top three were

    Kant
    John Stuart Mill
    Jean-Paul Sartre
     
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  4. slant

    slant Sedated slanty

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    1. Jean-Paul Sartre (100%)
    2. David Hume (88%)
    3. Aquinas (78%)
    4. Aristotle (73%)
    5. Kant (70%)
    6. Nietzsche (67%)
    7. Spinoza (64%)
    8. John Stuart Mill (61%)
    9. Nel Noddings (61%)
    10. Thomas Hobbes (61%)
    11. St. Augustine (57%)
    12. Stoics (55%)
    13. Jeremy Bentham (52%)
    14. Ockham (52%)
    15. Prescriptivism (44%)
    16. Cynics (35%)
    17. Plato (26%)
    18. Ayn Rand (21%)
    19. Epicureans (0%)

    By the way this test was crap. I don't agree with ANY of the options.
     
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  5. Sloe Djinn

    Sloe Djinn Idiot with Internet Access.

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    Agreed. The generated results are kind of interesting though. If I had more knowledge of the works of each philosopher it might be more fun.
     
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  6. VH

    VH Variable Hybrid

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    +1

    But then, I don't personally agree with any of the standard schools of philosophical thought. A test based on them wouldn't have any options that I'd agree with either.
     
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  7. IndigoSensor

    IndigoSensor Product Obtained
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    Only the first question was an issue for me, and I had to choose the last "no opinion" option because I just didn't like any of them. That being said. I didn't see this test as too bad, Some questions I knew what I felt right away. The hard part was setting priority for each one:

    -------

    1. Jean-Paul Sartre (100%)
    2.
    Kant (96%)
    3. John Stuart Mill (87%)
    4. Spinoza (86%)
    5. Aquinas (79%)
    6. Epicureans (76%)
    7. Prescriptivism (75%)
    8. Aristotle (74%)
    9. Jeremy Bentham (74%)
    10. Ayn Rand (59%)
    11. Nietzsche (55%)
    12. Stoics (53%)
    13. Ockham (51%)
    14. St. Augustine (48%)
    15. David Hume (34%)
    16. Nel Noddings (32%)
    17. Plato (30%)
    18. Thomas Hobbes (13%)
    19. Cynics (0%)

    Jean-Paul Sartre (1905-1980)
    [FONT=Arial, Helvetica]
    When we choose something, we affirm the value of our choice because we have chosen it above other choices
    When we choose something for ourselves, we should choose it for all people.
    We must be consistent in our interpretations of moral situations regardless of whom the agent is.
    Logic cannot help us specific situations
    Making conscious moral choices is more significant than consistently following moral guidelines
    The conflict between the interests of two people is in the end, irresolvable
    [/FONT]
    Immanuel Kant (1724-1804)
    [FONT=Arial, Helvetica]
    We can make a prior judgments; the negation of such judgments would a logical absurdity because a priori knowledge is known without sensory data.
    We combine a priori and a posteriori knowledge to
    We have freedom
    God is not essential for his moral argumentation
    The objective facts about the human knowledge leads to Kant's morality
    We must act ought of a sense of duty in order to be moral
    Moral action does not come out of following inclinations
    Moral standards must be followed without qualification
    We must always act so that the means of our actions could be a universal law
    We must always treat people as ends not means
    [/FONT]
    Mill, John Stuart (1806-1873)
    [FONT=Arial, Helvetica]
    The Utilitarian principle is correct when the quality of pleasures is accounted for
    Liberty is the most important pleasure
    [/FONT]


    Yup, those thee seem to fit me pretty well. The first guy fits very very well, the second not so much. I would have to edit a few things and or explain some, but overall it is quite a good fit.
     
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    #7 IndigoSensor, Mar 5, 2010
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2010
  8. NeverAmI

    NeverAmI Satisclassifaction
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    Excellent find on the test! Very fun. I have yet to study Mill/Kant, I checked Mill out on wikipedia and I don't agree extensively with his views. Eventually, I suppose I will just have to put my own philosophy out there. That is, assuming no one has already covered it and I just don't know about it. :D

    Mill's utilitarian principle seems based around happiness, eliciting actions that provide maximum happiness for the maximum number of people. Short-term happiness is SO trivial to existence. That doesn't mean we don't need it, but it most certainly isn't what man should be searching for, in itself. I sincerely hope wikipedia used the wrong word or that I am horribly simplifying Mill's ideas. We shall soon see.

    [​IMG]
     
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    #8 NeverAmI, Mar 5, 2010
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2010
  9. tovlo

    tovlo Well-known member

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    Interesting, but I didn't feel accurately represented by any of the philosophies as described.

    1. Aquinas (100%)
    2. John Stuart Mill (80%)
    3. Spinoza (76%)
    4. St. Augustine (74%)
    5. Epicureans (71%)
    6. Jean-Paul Sartre (64%)
    7. Ockham (63%)
    8. Aristotle (62%)
    9. Stoics (54%)
    10. Jeremy Bentham (52%)
    11. Kant (50%)
    12. Nietzsche (47%)
    13. Plato (46%)
    14. Nel Noddings (45%)
    15. Ayn Rand (39%)
    16. Thomas Hobbes (35%)
    17. David Hume (33%)
    18. Cynics (32%)
    19. Prescriptivism (26%)
     
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  10. Azure_Knight

    Azure_Knight Community Member

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    1. Kant (100 %)
    2. Jean-Paul Sartre (98 %)
    3. Nel Noddings (90 %)
    4. Nietzsche (90 %)
    5. Spinoza (78 %)
    6. Ayn Rand (77 %)
    7. Stoics (75 %)
    8. Aquinas (74 %)
    9. David Hume (69 %)
    10. Aristotle (68 %)
    11. St. Augustine (56 %)
    12. Epicureans (54 %)
    13. John Stuart Mill (51 %)
    14. Prescriptivism (49 %)
    15. Ockham (47 %)
    16. Jeremy Bentham (43 %)
    17. Thomas Hobbes (34 %)
    18. Cynics (33 %)
    19. Plato (18 %)
     
  11. Barnabas

    Barnabas Time Lord

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    Who would have thought I would have my top three be christian philosophers?

    1. St. Augustine (100%) Books, etc. Information link

    Augustine (354-430)
    Happiness is a union of the soul with God after one has died
    Bodily pleasures are relatively inferior to spiritual pleasures.
    Philosophical reasoning is not the path to wisdom and happiness.
    A love of God and faith in Jesus is the only path to happiness.
    God is the one to allow people to practice the love of God.
    One must love God in order to fulfill moral law.
    People are inherently evil; only the grace of God (or is it merit to be saved?) can


    2. Ockham (90%) Books, etc. Information link

    Ockham, William of (1285-1347/49)
    God's Will is the only determinant of good and evil.
    Faith and revelation, not philosophizing, allow one to know good from evil.

    3. Aquinas (87%) Books, etc. Information link

    Aquinas (1225 or '27-1274)
    All life has a purpose
    Meeting this purpose allows one to be happy.
    Happiness is to be found in the love of God.
    God's grace providing entrance into heaven creates the highest form of human happiness.
    Short of heaven, a person can achieve a more limited form of happiness through a life of virtue and friendship.
    Morality is not determined by the arbitrary will of God.
    Morality is derived from human nature and the activities that are objectively suited to it.
    The difference between right and wrong can be appreciated through the use of reason and reflection.
    Religious reflection may supplement the use of reason and reflection to determine right from wrong.

    4. Kant (84%) Books, etc. Information link

    5. John Stuart Mill (73%) Books, etc. Information link

    6. Jeremy Bentham (71%) Books, etc. Information link

    7. Jean-Paul Sartre (68%) Books, etc. Information link

    8. Spinoza (67%) Books, etc. Information link

    9. Prescriptivism (64%) Books, etc. Information link

    10. Epicureans (58%) Books, etc. Information link

    11. Aristotle (55%) Books, etc. Information link

    12. Ayn Rand (51%) Books, etc. Information link

    13. Nel Noddings (42%) Books, etc. Information link

    14. Cynics (38%) Books, etc. Information link

    15. David Hume (32%) Books, etc. Information link

    16. Nietzsche (32%) Books, etc. Information link

    17. Plato (30%) Books, etc. Information link

    18. Stoics (29%) Books, etc. Information link

    19. Thomas Hobbes (24%) Books, etc. Information link
     
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    #11 Barnabas, Mar 5, 2010
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2010
  12. DefectiveCreative

    Donor

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    1. John Stuart Mill (100%)
    2. Kant (96%)
    3. Jean-Paul Sartre (79%)
    4. Epicureans (79%)
    5. Jeremy Bentham (75%)
    6. Spinoza (75%)
    7. Aquinas (65%)
    8. Prescriptivism (64%)
    9. Aristotle (63%)
    10. Stoics (58%)
    11. Ayn Rand (55%)
    12. Nel Noddings (51%)
    13. Nietzsche (42%)
    14. Ockham (41%)
    15. David Hume (40%)
    16. Thomas Hobbes (33%)
    17. St. Augustine (32%)
    18. Plato (25%)
     
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  13. enfp can be shy

    enfp can be shy people vs the bad people?
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    Most of this is major bollocks but Spinoza makes some sense. I tend to think that ethics is simply irrelevant view on systems. It's outdated and primitive, jungle-like racket, and is related to the whole crime-punishment mentality. Most of my answers were that it doesn't matter.

    1. Spinoza (100 %)
    2. Jean-Paul Sartre (86 %)
    3. St. Augustine (83 %)
    4. Aquinas (79 %)
    5. Stoics (76 %)
    6. Plato (71 %)
    7. Jeremy Bentham (69 %)
    8. Aristotle (68 %)
    9. Ayn Rand (58 %)
    10. Kant (49 %)
    11. Nietzsche (45 %)
    12. David Hume (36 %)
    13. Epicureans (36 %)
    14. John Stuart Mill (36 %)
    15. Nel Noddings (32 %)
    16. Ockham (24 %)
    17. Prescriptivism (24 %)
    18. Cynics (0 %)
    19. Thomas Hobbes (0 %)

    [​IMG] [FONT=Arial, Helvetica]
    Spinoza, Baruch (later known as Benedictus)
    (1632-1677)
    [/FONT]
    [FONT=Arial, Helvetica]Determinist
    Something must have a desirable affect on man in order to be good
    Must understand determinism of the world

    [/FONT]P.S. Can't believe that Ayn Rand and Plato are so high. Kill the creatures with fire! I would prefer Skinner and Aristotle any day.[FONT=Arial, Helvetica]
    [/FONT]
     
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    #13 enfp can be shy, Mar 5, 2010
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2010
  14. Stu

    Stu .
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    John Stuart Mill

    1.100% John Stuart Mill
     
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    #14 Stu, Mar 5, 2010
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2010
  15. Moxie

    Moxie Absent-Minded Professor

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    [FONT=&quot]Cool test!

    1. Jean-Paul Sartre (100 %) [/FONT][FONT=&quot]
    [/FONT][FONT=&quot] 2. Kant (100 %) [/FONT][FONT=&quot]
    [/FONT][FONT=&quot] 3. Spinoza (88 %) [/FONT][FONT=&quot]
    [/FONT][FONT=&quot] 4. David Hume (83 %) [/FONT][FONT=&quot]
    [/FONT][FONT=&quot] 5. Stoics (82 %) [/FONT][FONT=&quot]
    [/FONT][FONT=&quot] 6. John Stuart Mill (77 %) [/FONT][FONT=&quot]
    [/FONT][FONT=&quot] 7. Nietzsche (75 %) [/FONT][FONT=&quot]
    [/FONT][FONT=&quot] 8. Plato (62 %) [/FONT][FONT=&quot]
    [/FONT][FONT=&quot] 9. St. Augustine (59 %) [/FONT][FONT=&quot]
    [/FONT][FONT=&quot] 10. Thomas Hobbes (58 %) [/FONT][FONT=&quot]
    [/FONT][FONT=&quot] 11. Ayn Rand (56 %) [/FONT][FONT=&quot]
    [/FONT][FONT=&quot] 12. Epicureans (56 %) [/FONT][FONT=&quot]
    [/FONT][FONT=&quot] 13. Jeremy Bentham (54 %) [/FONT][FONT=&quot]
    [/FONT][FONT=&quot] 14. Aquinas (53 %) [/FONT][FONT=&quot]
    [/FONT][FONT=&quot] 15. Prescriptivism (53 %) [/FONT][FONT=&quot]
    [/FONT][FONT=&quot] 16. Aristotle (40 %) [/FONT][FONT=&quot]
    [/FONT][FONT=&quot] 17. Ockham (37 %) [/FONT][FONT=&quot]
    [/FONT][FONT=&quot] 18. Cynics (32 %) [/FONT][FONT=&quot]
    [/FONT][FONT=&quot] 19. Nel Noddings (29 %) [/FONT]
     
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  16. On my own path

    On my own path Community Member

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    Ayn Rand (100%) Books, etc. Information link
    2. Kant (96%) Books, etc. Information link
    3. Jean-Paul Sartre (92%) Books, etc. Information link
    4. St. Augustine (89%) Books, etc. Information link
    5. Ockham (87%) Books, etc. Information link
    6. Aquinas (81%) Books, etc. Information link
    7. Spinoza (74%) Books, etc. Information link
    8. Jeremy Bentham (69%) Books, etc. Information link
    9. Prescriptivism (69%) Books, etc. Information link
    10. Aristotle (67%) Books, etc. Information link
    11. John Stuart Mill (67%) Books, etc. Information link
    12. Epicureans (65%) Books, etc. Information link
    13. Nietzsche (65%) Books, etc. Information link
    14. Stoics (58%) Books, etc. Information link
    15. Plato (52%) Books, etc. Information link
    16. David Hume (45%) Books, etc. Information link
    17. Nel Noddings (32%) Books, etc. Information link
    18. Cynics (29%) Books, etc. Information link
    19. Thomas Hobbes (16%) Books, etc. Information link
     
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  17. IndigoSensor

    IndigoSensor Product Obtained
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    Hmm, I am seeing a pattern here.

    We have to get some other types in here to take this and see if the pattern holds or not.
     
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  18. acd

    acd Well-known member

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    Holy crap. I can't stand Ayn Rand and her writings, yet I scored 100% Ayn Rand?
    Muy Interesante...
     
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  19. NeverAmI

    NeverAmI Satisclassifaction
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    5w4
    I haven't read anything of hers yet. I am interested to see what she is all about.
     
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  20. OP
    BlinkandThink

    BlinkandThink Community Member

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2009
    Threads:
    17
    Messages:
    699
    Likes Received:
    67
    Trophy Points:
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    MBTI:
    FREE
    Enneagram:
    7w6
    Irrespective of type, the people who frequent this internet forum seem to be onboard with Kant, Sartre, Spinoza, Aquinas, and John Stuart Mill.
     
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