Life as a (Visual) Artist: an Inquiry on Deviant Perspectives | INFJ Forum

Life as a (Visual) Artist: an Inquiry on Deviant Perspectives

Discussion in 'Education and Careers' started by KazeCraven, Oct 3, 2010.

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  1. KazeCraven

    KazeCraven Graduated from Typology : May 2011
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    My first conscious inquiry on perspectives: what is it like to live as an artist?

    Err... I'm making this as a thread for open discussion on life as an artist. I've done some research myself, which is in the next post, but if you have experience on the issue, or questions, those are welcome.


     
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    KazeCraven

    KazeCraven Graduated from Typology : May 2011
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    So far I've concluded that professional artists...

    -stay in the know about the ongoings in their specific field (i.e. read contemporary art magazines or equivalent)
    -practice and get feedback on their craft (usually through art school)
    -network with other artists, both experienced and peers
    -learn business skills to market their work effectively

    Supposedly, if you are somewhat talented and dedicated to a particular art, and you aren't wedded to fine art, it is usually quite possible (i.e. not absurd) to pursue a career in art. However, successful artists usually have to figure out how to pay the bills in other ways for a while until they have both had a chance to get some experience in the field as well as go to school and get a degree in their field (usually an MFA).

    However, the caveat is that getting into a good school with a scholarship usually requires that you have both performed well in school and have a good portfolio to present. By this point, you would have almost inevitably made the necessary connections so getting the required recommendations shouldn't be an issue. The other caveat, which I just realized, is that this all assumes that you have already been rather involved in the art world or are in a position to enter into it (e.g. freedom in college or equivalent).
     
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    #2 KazeCraven, Oct 3, 2010
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2010
  3. Gaze

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    Very good summary of what artists must do. Another key element is that artists must continue to make art. They must always be thinking and considering different ways to fine tune and refine their artistic talents. They must continually seek feedback, check on currency and relevancy of their artistic creations, make adjustments, consider new points of view or ways of looking at art in general or different ways for looking at their artwork, etc. Read art magazines, go to art galleries, meet with other artists, and talk about art, culture, and society. Experiment in various artistic styles.

    They should read and review other artists for the sake or appreciation, critique, new understandings of where art is headed, and unique ways for art to be a form of expression, whether that is an expression of feeling, content, message, form, style, society, artistry, the artist, beauty, etc.

    For example, an artist's self portrait is never really just about the artist. It's often a critique of the concept of self presentation, or a commentary on the construction of identity by self vs. society.
     
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    #3 Gaze, Oct 3, 2010
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2010
  4. IndigoSensor

    IndigoSensor Product Obtained
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    To me being an artist would be too stressful for me. It almost seems like luck in some cases on how sucessful you become in the end (even though I know that is far from true). I did ceramics for 4 years in highschool and I became extremely tallented at it in the end. I could have gone to art school for that, but I wouldn't make it through because my 2D art skills aren't up to par for an undergraduate degree.

    Honestly, I think being an artist (more so as a studio artist), would be one of the most stressful career paths one could be on. It's very unpredicable, and your image is equally (if not more so) important.
     
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  5. Sriracha

    Sriracha Not here.
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    I have been a successful artist (drawings) in my community in the past, but unfortunately had to put down my pencil for the last two years due to work overload. Even though I enjoy art, it became "work" and stressful. One problem an INFJ will have with the art realm is managing commissioned work. The "J" wishes so much to complete all tasks, and that is simply not possible (unless you rush through your work and make it look horrible.)

    Now that I have tasted the real world, and rigid work schedules ... I am ready to return to art, mainly because it gives me the ability to have a flexible schedule.
     
    #5 Sriracha, Jul 15, 2011
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2011
  6. randomsomeone

    randomsomeone Well-known member

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    I just got lucky, I guess, finding niches of profitable work where no one would even think to look.
     
  7. Sriracha

    Sriracha Not here.
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    Now that like putting a can of tuna in front of a cat and never opening it. hehe
     
  8. Seraffa

    Seraffa Community Member

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    Not to hurt feelings and all, but this seems terribly stuffed shirt. I keep wondering from what you write if A.) if you're doing a writen paper or if B.) you're torturing yourself considering how to be a "successful professional artist" without indulging yourself in creating something right now. You sound like me a year ago when I was considering how to make a comeback as an artist.
     
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  9. Questingpoet

    Questingpoet Not Afraid to Use His Beard
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    It seems by "artist" you seem to mean painter/photographer/graphic design only. I consider myself an artist (not a professional one) in the literature medium. There are other fields that would fall under the broad catagory of "art" nowdays too such as dancer or perhaps those who create art digitally. I think in general people associate art as some type of creative endeavour nowdays as opposed to the past where it simply meant "painter". Just my take. I think the things you talk about apply to most of the other creative arts too.
     
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