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HSP

Discussion in 'The INFJ Typology' started by firehotemily, Mar 26, 2009.

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  1. firehotemily

    firehotemily Community Member

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    Can you get mixed up in your personality type because of being an HSP (highly sensitive person)? Because i think you can have different personalities and still be an HSP. or..do you think otherwise?]
    I say that i am an INFJ but some say i'm an ENFJ, i'm not sure if i'm even a personality type anymore xD
    i just wonder if i might not be an INFJ because of the fact that i'm a HSP...or...is an HSP an INFJ?
    What personality type do these traits most likely fall into?

    An HSP is a Highly Sensitive Person
    here's some statistics they have...
    Who do you think these people are personality type wise?
     
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    #1 firehotemily, Mar 26, 2009
    Last edited: Mar 26, 2009
  2. yepunsarang

    yepunsarang Community Member

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    I think being an HSP doesn't have to minutely have to deal with personality type. Of course, some personality types are definitely NOT HSP like INTJs, but I would think INFJs are a type that tends to be highly HSP.

    Never really knew this thing called "HSP" existed, but I knew I was always highly sensitive...it just brought it out for me. Thanks for the info! It kind of feels like the time I found out I was an INFJ and read about the type. I knew I was all of those things, but I never saw them all put together in one place. Yeah, being HSP is a bit hard, though I think its something really special.
     
  3. Eric86

    Eric86 Community Member

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    Well, I just went through this list again, more honestly this time, and 24 of them apply to me. The only ones that don't are the ones about caffeine (it has no effect on me whatsoever), loud noises (though there are certain ones that will bother me, but usually it doesn't bother me), and violent entertainment (real violence does bother me, but fantasy violence does not, though certain movies that have scenes involving torture [especially of women, or anything where women are treated badly] really bother me a lot and sometimes even make me cry. I remember watching The Passion of the Christ in the theater, and I cried really hard throughout almost the whole entire movie, and kept crying throughout all of the credits, and wasn't able to stop until about half an hour after the credits were done. I absolutely could not stand it...and I never want to watch that movie again.).
     
    #3 Eric86, May 11, 2009
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  4. Hotherym

    Hotherym Community Member

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    HSP is likely the same thing as someone on the autistic spectrum, or possibly even schizophrenic spectrum (they're interrelated, anyway). Keep in mind sensory issues are very common, if not a staple, in Asperger's and other forms of autism, as a result of neurological imbalance.

    What's it have to do with type? Probably not much at all, except Ns and Is are probably more likely to be found on the spectrum than ES types, though it can vary.
     
  5. Eric86

    Eric86 Community Member

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    I am probably somewhere on that, though I don't know where exactly. I've done a decent bit of reading on it (it's also been highly suggested that I have some form of autism by my aunt who has been an RN for god knows how long, and she's seen a lot of people like that), but I can't quite figure out where I would be.
     
    #5 Eric86, May 12, 2009
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  6. Hotherym

    Hotherym Community Member

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    It doesn't really matter, in the end. Usually, mild autistic traits of any worthy note are clumped as 'Asperger's' for adults, and the diagnostic criteria for that are broadening.

    But when I look around at people, I see 'traits' in a lot of them, so it probably should just be considered natural variation, at this point. It's when it makes life particularly difficult for someone that any diagnosis makes a difference.
     
  7. spnemo

    spnemo Four

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    I realize this is an old thread but some correction is in order. HSP and Autism spectrum disorders are only tangentially related. The only thing they have in common is high sensitivity. Almost everything else is very different. HSPs are sensitive because they process the senses deeply. Autism spectrum disorder has to do with improper processing of the senses. HSPs are highly socially skilled and empathetic while autism is a form of social disfunction and lack a sense of empathy. In many ways the two are mirror images of each other.
     
  8. Paladin-X

    Paladin-X Permanent Fixture

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    I disagree. The senses are processed deeply because they are being processed improperly. Furthermore, Autism is not synonymous with a lack of empathy or social dysfunction. It is a developmental disorder, of which, social dysfunction will likely develop.

    With that said, sensory processing disorder (or HSP) is a symptom of Autism Spectrum Disorder. However, if you have sensory processing disorder, it does not necessarily mean that you are Autistic.
     
    #8 Paladin-X, Mar 28, 2013
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  9. spnemo

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    HSP is distinct from the autism spectrum and it is not a disorder. It is a preference shared by 20% of the population that can be either possitive or negative depending on the circumstances. For many the trait of HSP helps them function at very high levels. It is a gift not a disorder.
     
  10. Vilku

    Vilku Community Member

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    i think types with Ni rather than Si and introversion rather than extroversion have a tendency for hsp. only it tends to come differently for each type. like an istp hsp would be hypersensitive to being watched by other people. whereas isfp hsp would be hypersensitive to what other people think of them. and so on etc. and like, im hsp of sensual things such as pollution in the air. and generally obsessive towards perfection so i have zero tolerance for my injuries which bother me ALOT..
     
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  11. the

    the Si master race.
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    Seems like hsp is more of a sensor thing. Probably isfp.
     
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