Are you a Critical Thinker? | INFJ Forum

Are you a Critical Thinker?

Discussion in 'Psychology and MBTI' started by Satya, Apr 23, 2009.

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  1. Satya

    Satya C'est la vie
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    CRITICAL OR SCIENTIFIC THINKING Results in reliable knowledge (knowledge that has a strong likelihood of being true) or justified true belief (belief that is probably true because it is justified by a proven method).

    UNCRITICAL OR NONSCIENTIFIC THINKING Results in unreliable knowledge or unjustified belief. This knowledge may be true, but we have no confidence that it is except by faith and hope. Often this knowledge is not true.

    Logical Thinking Characterized by reliance on correct forms of reasoning that use logic in a proper manner. Premises are reliable and conclusions follow logically.
    Illogical Thinking Characterized by fallacious reasoning, specious arguments, false analogies, knowledge claims supported by inadequate or unreliable premises.

    Empirical Thinking
    Relies on objective sensory experience (empirical evidence). Such evidence is repeatable, measurable, and testable by others.
    Intuitive Thinking Belief in the superiority of the mind's powers; that knowledge of reality can be obtained by subjective experience or intuition alone.

    Pragmatic Thinking
    Recognizes that wishes and hopes do not make a belief true or even worth holding.
    Hopeful/Wishful Thinking The willing suspension of disbelief because of devout wishes and hopes.

    Skeptical Thinking
    Constant critical questioning of the reliability of any knowledge we claim to possess, and requiring adequate grounds for any belief or claim to knowledge.
    Authoritarian Thinking Uncritical belief is some doctrine or authority, especially without adequate grounds; unquestioning and credulous acceptance of knowledge claims made by an authority figure or institution.

    Reflective Thinking
    Characterized by the willingness to temporarily suspend belief and reflect on the sufficiency of the belief's premises or logic and the consequences of believing or acting on those beliefs. Identifies and recognizes assumptions.
    Dogmatic Thinking Characterized by the unwillingness to suspend belief and reflect on the sufficiency of the belief's premises, and ignoring the consequences of believing or acting on those beliefs. Refuses to recognize or acknowledge groundless assumptions.

    Realistic Thinking
    Predicated on the belief that phenomena or objects of sense perception exist independently of the mind, and these provide an objective reality that can be known.
    Idealistic Thinking Based on the premise that true knowledge of reality lies only in the consciousness or reason, in the sense that objective reality transcends phenomena of sense perception.

    Statistical Thinking
    Recognition that many empirical phenomena are understood and known only in statistical terms or in a sense that deals with probabilities, not certainties.
    Absolutist Thinking Belief in absolutes, and thinking characterized by holding to extreme or black and white positions that see no middle ground or gray areas.

    Creative Thinking
    Characterized by the search for new facts and ideas which are put together in unusal and creative ways. Ability to think in new and innovative ways.
    Close-minded Thinking The unwillingness to entertain new facts and ideas or use them in new and creative ways. Reliance on old or traditional ways of thinking.

    Comprehensible Thinking
    Evidence used to reach conclusions is empirical, repeatable, testable, verifiable, analyzable, and objective.
    Mystical Thinking Evidence used to reach conclusions is ephemeral, ineffable, intuitive, unverifiable, sporadic, and subjective.

    Reasonable Thinking
    Characterized by a reliance on reason to search for and discover reliable knowledge. Emotions are not evidence, and feelings are not facts.
    Emotional Thinking Characterized by a reliance on emotion and feeling to search for and discover truth or knowledge, and a pervasive distrust of reason.

    Quantitative Thinking
    Describing nature and reality in quantitative terms.
    Qualitative Thinking Describing nature and reality in often ambiguous and and imprecise qualitative terms.

    Analytical Thinking
    Routinely comprehending the universe by a conscious and reasoned process of analysis, clarification, comparison, inference, and evaluation.
    Ordinary Thinking Routinely comprehending the universe by an unexamined thought process without concern for its accuracy or completeness.
     
    #1 Satya, Apr 23, 2009
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2009
  2. TenorKite

    TenorKite Community Member

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    I like how you've chosen red for critical thinking and blue for uncritical thinking. Blue being a calm color of retreat and red being audacious and down to earth. Were these choices conscious? Personally I can't stand a person who's overly objective, nor someone who's overly whimsical.
     
    #2 TenorKite, Apr 23, 2009
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2009
  3. OP
    Satya

    Satya C'est la vie
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    You would have to ask the author of the website I stole them from.

    http://www.freeinquiry.com/critical-notes.html

    You are in the wrong place then because INFJs can easily be both.
     
  4. Liv

    Liv Community Member

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    I would think im mainly critical in my thinking cuz i can be very sceptical until there is sufficient proof to prove a point.my 6th year english teachers phrase i remember most was ban unsubstantiated sentances and i like to follow through as much as possible on that.i analyze nearly everything,its rare when im not.yet i contemplate on all the facts to see if it rings true to my beliefs and if not why it doesnt etc.,im also a deeply emotional thinker but use the more critical parts of my thinking to ground myself and see points objectively.i find using both streams of thought helpful to gain insight from varying p.o.vs and really dislike to neglect either aspect of my mind.
     
  5. Quinlan

    Quinlan Right the First Time!

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    I'm a red.
     
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  6. TheLastMohican

    TheLastMohican Captain Obvious
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    Would anyone really choose blue after reading those descriptions?
     
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  7. Lune Froide

    Lune Froide Community Member

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    I value critical thinking but I know I have a ways to go before my uncritical thinking losing it's prominence in situations i'm over-excited about.

    Cool reminder post for me, though! Thanks.
     
  8. Quinlan

    Quinlan Right the First Time!

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    Teehee
     
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