Physical decline in old age | INFJ Forum

Physical decline in old age

Discussion in 'Health and Wellness' started by TinyBubbles, May 17, 2010.

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  1. TinyBubbles

    TinyBubbles anarchist

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    curious about the aging process and whether a PHYSICAL decline is inevitable. many persons within their 40's, 50's, 60's+ that i've talked to have mentioned at one time or another how they don't have as much energy as they used to, how they can't lose weight as quickly as they used to, how they can't stay up as late, and how they contract infectious diseases like colds more easily now and have more trouble remembering small details like the date than they used to. is this common-- do we all become physically weaker as we age? and how much would a healthy diet & exercise at a young age affect your physical health as you mature?
     
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  2. Ergo Christobal

    Ergo Christobal Talking Lightbulb
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    Good diet and exercise help, but eventually everyone's cells forget how to replicate they way they're supposed to and eventually lead to health problems.

    Then again, the I think the average life expectancy raises by one year per year. this might be mostly medicine, but I think we take care of ourselves too now that we know the roots of many health issues.

    My grandmother needs a walker, has trouble with stairs, asks me the same question three times in the same hour, and falls asleep with a glass of scotch to Ellen DeGeneres blaring every night. (Side note: she's the one from that episode awhile back)

    She has a physical trainer that's older then her, that woman goes on hikes and manages her own chiropractic gig. It's all relative to the person.
     
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  3. Norton

    Norton XXXX

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    It's true! At least for me. I'm in great shape. I'm as strong as I've ever been. I'm an obligate exerciser. But...I pull my muscles more often, I get sore and stay sore longer. Should I get out of shape (unlikely) it takes longer to get back into shape. I'm crazy about skiing and ski as much as I can. But the first day of skiing of the season really makes me sore, more sore than I used to get, despite the ease and benefits of shaped skis (I learned on straight skis, which were much more difficult to use than the newer designs of today). I'm more apt to get altitude sickness, and my balance seems to be getting worse, too. When I was young I used to run up and down mountains with no worry of falling in either direction. Walking on ice was no problem. Yet, just this past winter I bought special treads that fit over one's shoes to provide greater traction on ice. This need never would have occurred to me five or ten years ago.

    And, last December I got "tennis elbow" by scraping ice on my car's windshield, of all things! It still hurts despite twice weekly sessions with a physical therapist (he's great!). When you're young, you can afford to be out of shape, because it only takes a week or two of exercise to get back into shape. When you're older, it's much more important to work out consistently, if not compulsively, because the negative consequences of being out of shape are greater. I don't feel old, despite what my kids always tell me. Even though I'm in good shape, reasonably strong and muscular, and thin, I developed sleep apnea two years ago and have to sleep with a pump (CPAP) that keeps my pharynx and trachea inflated so I don't stop breathing during my sleep. When something like this happens, it's a bit of a surprise (and a bit scary), because I don't think of myself as old and less functional. But, it is what it is. You adapt, and you're glad that you don't have something worse, because there are always worse things to have. Believe me, looking at me, you'd never know these things. You'd think I was perfectly normal and healthy, and maybe a bit distinguished. But, normal and healthy is an age related norm.

    When you're young, you don't often think that life is finite. But, it is. And, this becomes evident as you get on in life. Now, at the age of 59, my attitude about things has changed. For example, I'm much more directed in my reading and learning. I don't feel that I have the time left to dissipate in undefined, inchoate interests. I really am more goal oriented, and these goals are more realistic and defined according to a shorter time line.

    I've been married to my wife, a prominent academic physician researcher (and INFJ) for 35 years, so we know how to live healthily and have done so throughout our marriage. Yet, at the same time that I feel experienced and secure emotionally, I feel more vulnerable, physically. One goes up and the other goes down. Ironic, it is.
     
  4. testing

    On Holiday

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    Based on my own experience and observations, the older you get, the less forgiving your body will be to poor lifestyle choices, injuries, and just plain unlucky genetic breaks.

    I've known people in their 60s and 70s who regularly compete in olympic-level track and field events, and who look extremely buff. I see people of the same age hobbled by poor diets, obesity, sedentary lifestyles, smoking and drinking too much. In your teens and 20s, you can abuse your body and bounce back; but by the time you're in your 30s and up that is not the case anymore.

    I will say that personally, for me, with a reasonably good lifestyle (okay, probably should lay off the Jelly Bellys!) and good genes, I feel great at almost 40, my metabolism has not slowed down, and I do seem to have reasonably good resistance to colds and things still. But I don't smoke at all, rarely drink, exercise regularly, and make somewhat half-arsed attempts at eating well. I'm sure if I was more of a harder partier I would be feeling the consequences at this point in my life.

    My granddaddy used to climb really tall pine trees in his 80s. Not sure why-- probably because they were there and he could! But he was pretty energetic until the very last few years of his life. My parents work out at a gym in their 70s, and have enough energy to travel a lot and have a very active social life. (and care for my very energetic young boys on occassion!)

    On the other hand, I've seen people lose their mobility and energy not through injury or illness, but through bad decisions that have ruined their bodies. And as you get older, injury and illness is simply more likely through no fault of your own. (cancer, various accidents, etc.)

    Personally, I never want to be incapacitated to the point that my body is a burden and a trap to me, so I realy do try to treat it well! I plan on using it for quite a while longer.
     
  5. MindYourHead

    MindYourHead Courage doesn't always roar.

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    People often guess me as being 8-10 years younger than I am.
    At 49 my joints are more apt to ache after being strained. Stairs are killer on my knees.
    I work out at a club at least 4 days a week, and for the most part I feel I am holding up quite well despite being abusive to my body when I was younger. Drinking, drugs, smoking, fast food.

    My vision deteriorated seemingly overnight in my early 40's.
    I now need reader's, and had cataract surgery last year to replace the lens in my Right eye. My Left eye isn't far behind.
    It's rare for someone my age to have that procedure.

    I have a hard time staying awake late. I always have good intentions of staying up to watch SNL for example, but invariably will wake up in my chair after it is over.
    (I recorded it when Betty White hosted.)
    I think the innability to stay up late is more the result of my body clock not being set to stay up late week.

    I haven't had so much as a cold in years. My wife and Son can be sick for a week and I won't get anything. Which kind of pisses her off.
     
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  6. VH

    VH Variable Hybrid

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    Yours was so close to mine, I'm just going to comment on the differences.

     
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    #6 VH, May 17, 2010
    Last edited: May 17, 2010
    enfp can be shy and Wyote like this.
  7. deadred

    deadred Community Member

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    I'm 57 and have been told I look like I am in my 40s, which I see as a good thing. Most of my physical problems are from football. I dearly loved it, but now wish I'd taken up golf in jr high instead. No phones, no Coaches up your ass, and plenty of breeze. I've needed a total knee replacement for 15 years, both of my shoulders are shot, I have two herniated discs in my neck and two more in my lumbar spine. These cause chronic pain in both my arms and in both legs. It's time to start working out again. If I am cautious, it takes about 3 months to start feeling good again. The biggest factor is genetics, IMO. I am from very good stock, and many of my ancestors had big risk factors but lived into their 80s and 90s. I've known some teetotalers who no risk factors who were quite fit but had serious health problems anyway. Pick your poison!
     
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  8. Ecton

    Ecton Community Member

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    Metabolism slows. That's can be compensated for.

    Memory functions change and get slack. The 'stack-like memory' gets fuzzier. Wisdom compensates.

    But then you'll be jogging downhill and tear a muscle. It will just rip. Like that. And then you will think "I'll just wait for it to heal." But it will take twice as long to heal.

    And then you'll be at a part with friends when you develop a gall stone.

    And then you'll get a detached retina.

    And little bumps will appear on your skin. its just not smooth anymore.

    And then you will get discoloration on your joints. And you won't be able to hold a paper bag as you carry it down the street. It will just hurt.

    It just goes from there.

    But there's good parts too!!!
     
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    #8 Ecton, Aug 3, 2010
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2010
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