Is it possible to confuse an intuitive with a sensor? | INFJ Forum

Is it possible to confuse an intuitive with a sensor?

Discussion in 'Psychology and MBTI' started by sassafras, Jul 20, 2010.

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  1. sassafras

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    I was thinking about this a while ago when I was on a random, test-taking spree and got ESFJ a couple of times in a row. Barring any fault with the test, or some gross lack of competence on my part when taking the test, I got to wondering if certain function combinations can sometimes mimic what appears to be a preference for either intuition or sensing?

    When you're trying to type someone, what sort of things (traits, habits, behaviors, patterns of thinking/communicating, etc.) do you look for when deciding whether this person is a sensor or an intuitive?


     
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  2. Odyne

    Odyne ===========
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    I have the same situation and been wondering the same thing.

    I am also curious for input. =)
     
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  3. Raccoon Love

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    This has always been the hardest, in fact it was the functions I missed the most.

    I think since it is a perceiving function, internal driving and how we perceive the world it can be very hard to grasp in terms of mannerism, expressions etc.

    Unless I am unaware of something.
     
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  4. AUM

    AUM The Romantic Scientist

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    I've noticed that with sensors you need to elaborate tasks step by step in order for them to get the idea, and once they get it, they tend to do it the same way it was showed to them.(This may apply only to SJ's, not so sure)

    With intuitives, you need to do a top-down procedure by explaining why were doing such task and then explaining the details as they go along. Also, intuitives don't read manual instructions lol(well, at least for me I hate reading manual instructions :p)
     
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  5. Faye

    Faye ^_^
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    It is possible to confuse anyone with anything, especially on all the poorly constructed tests out there.
     
  6. Odyne

    Odyne ===========
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    I agree with this. However, without the tests, how do you differentiate between an N-type and an S-type? I mean, in terms of behavior, information processing, or learning, reacting and such.
     
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  7. OP
    sassafras

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    I agree that it is possible to confuse anything with inadequate tools or a personal bias; in fact, I wanted to account for that when I mentioned "barring any fault of the actual test or gross incompetence on my part" in the original post. :)

    What I'm after is the specifics of how and why in appealing to the limitations (or possible confusions) of the theory itself. What are your thoughts on that?
     
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    #7 sassafras, Jul 20, 2010
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2010
  8. Kavalan

    Kavalan Has risen

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    Yes I believed myself to be intuitive when I was a sensor and it was me not reaching the root of my actions and cutting off the thought process and thus looked as if I was being intuitive when I was going through a set of motions so second nature I couldn't tell unless I looked at it in my mind and asked why I did what I did(A convo with Indi made this very clear).
     
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  9. Faye

    Faye ^_^
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    The S/N dichotomy is the most sketchy of the MBTI dichotomies because there are supposedly so few intuitives relative to sensors. In terms of information processing, the key for intuitives is the ability to process information categorically as opposed to literally and linearly as with sensors.

    For example, highly intuitive people are more likely to use, understand and appreciate metaphor. Metaphor is a non-linear approach to synthesizing information. If I had to choose a defining characteristic of intuition, I would choose metaphor. Some would call intuition the ability to perceive possibilities in the external world or even in internal systems, but sensors do that too. The difference is that intuitive can generate more possibilities faster, but they can't do it in ways that are readily justifiable. Hence metaphor.

    Problems with the theory? Well, the theory depends on self-perception of individuals, so if a highly intuitive individual were to view their thought patterns as concrete and step by step as I often do because they are so used to such an irregular mode of synthesizing information, their answers might not match up to how they actually think. I assume the same is possible in reverse, but I'm not sure how.

    The theory is a gross oversimplification; we know that. Obviously, there are some people who are very good at gathering information with both S and N functions. These people, who probably constitute a significant portion of the population, may use both kinds of functions to significant degrees, especially if they are highly intelligent. These people are probably the easiest to confuse (not necessarily the intelligent ones). I do believe that some people use S and N functions to an equal degree.
     
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  10. AUM

    AUM The Romantic Scientist

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    Yep, that's true. But there will always be function that will be used more than the other. You can't sense and intuit something at the same time, but I wouldn't be surprised that people are capable of processing information through both of their information-gathering functions, in fact, that would be more effective and efficient, than just using one.
     
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  11. Adymus

    Adymus Community Member

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    Well the tests suck, so they are bound to get much more than N/S wrong.

    But yes, it is very possible to get the N/S dichotomy wrong, in fact, it is probably the most common to have an error.

    This is not a product of function combinations, but the fact that all people have conscious use over both a Sensing and Intuitive functions. Our environment is not always validating or nurturing of our natural function preferences, in fact it is often quite the opposite. Because of this, many intuitive downplay their intuitive functions, and over use their sensing functions, because they have been conditioned by the world because using their sensing functions gave them better results. This does not make them a sensor, and you can certainly tell that something is off, because they won't actually have high energy levels like a true sensor who uses their abilities as they are naturally supposed to be used. Over use of lower cognitive functions creates this stress lock, or chronic grip state as Naomi Quenk put it, and this is the cause of many a mistyping.
     
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  12. Quinlan

    Quinlan Right the First Time!

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    All I know is that not "being in the moment" sounds terribly foreign tome.
     
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  13. 88chaz88

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    +1
     
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  14. Gaze

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    I doubt i'm a sensor but i've always questioned the intuitive label and what that truly means. Tricky distinction.
     
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  15. 88chaz88

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    You've always seemed very Ni to me.
     
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  16. Orion

    Orion Strength through understanding
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    I think a way to differentiate the two is to look at how they perceive things on a global level- not necessarily looking at their behavioural characteristics in the immediate environment. So look at how the person regards where there life is heading and the things they desire and want to achieve because how they use their opposite perception, may be serving their overall sensory or intuitive life goals.

    I know I use sensing for the majority of my time whilst training but i'm using sensing to get things done for the purposes of my strong NF values.
     
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  17. Gaze

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    http://www.cognitiveprocesses.com/
     
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  18. 88chaz88

    88chaz88 Back for a limited time only
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    And it's damn awesome!
     
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  19. arbygil

    arbygil Passing through

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    Actually, that's some good advice right there...and that's almost a revelation for me (see bolded parts). And it also explains the "loopiness" of an intuitive a bit, too. We're not in the moment. We're somewhere else. And I can't tell you how many times I've got a, "where are you" when I said something my Sensor friends thought was really random.

    Good thoughts, Adymus.
     
  20. testing

    On Holiday

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    Yes, I also agree that I haave learned to try very hard to use my sensing function, with some success. I was thinking about this very thing just this morning, standing there waiting to cross the street and not noticing the traffic light had changed.

    True.

    But it is actually very cool when it does work, there are such a lot of beautiful and interesting things to notice in the world.
     
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