infj and other types: teaching vs. educating | INFJ Forum

infj and other types: teaching vs. educating

Discussion in 'The INFJ Typology' started by bs98r3kjf, Oct 28, 2009.

Share This Page

More threads by bs98r3kjf
  1. bs98r3kjf

    bs98r3kjf Well-known member

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2009
    Threads:
    115
    Messages:
    2,745
    Likes Received:
    142
    Trophy Points:
    0
    MBTI:
    none
    Enneagram:
    none
    What's the difference between teaching and educating? If teaching is more involved with helping your students' develop certain skills and abilities, what is educating? Is it the same as teaching or does it have a greater significance? And how do you think an INFJ teacher can do both for his/her students at the same time? Do you think it might be easier for some types to teach and educate at the same time than others? How so?
     
  2. bamf

    bamf Is Watching You
    Retired Staff

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2009
    Threads:
    289
    Messages:
    10,794
    Likes Received:
    1,933
    Trophy Points:
    453
    MBTI:
    Meh
    Enneagram:
    Meh
    I had no idea that there was considered a difference between teaching and educating. To me it's all semantics.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  3. OP
    bs98r3kjf

    bs98r3kjf Well-known member

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2009
    Threads:
    115
    Messages:
    2,745
    Likes Received:
    142
    Trophy Points:
    0
    MBTI:
    none
    Enneagram:
    none
    The way I see it, educating sort of enables them to use and apply the skills that they were taught to their lives, not just inside academic settings. I think each person sees it differently though.
     
    #3 bs98r3kjf, Oct 28, 2009
    Last edited: Oct 28, 2009
  4. bamf

    bamf Is Watching You
    Retired Staff

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2009
    Threads:
    289
    Messages:
    10,794
    Likes Received:
    1,933
    Trophy Points:
    453
    MBTI:
    Meh
    Enneagram:
    Meh
    If that's the case, I'd definitely say education has more significance. Application of what is learned to life outside of the classroom is extremely important in my view.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  5. OP
    bs98r3kjf

    bs98r3kjf Well-known member

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2009
    Threads:
    115
    Messages:
    2,745
    Likes Received:
    142
    Trophy Points:
    0
    MBTI:
    none
    Enneagram:
    none
    Do you think INFJ teachers are better or worse than some of the other types with that? Like maybe some types are better at teaching the skills but don't really know how to reach their students in a way that will encourage and enable them to be able to apply it in their lives?
     
  6. bamf

    bamf Is Watching You
    Retired Staff

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2009
    Threads:
    289
    Messages:
    10,794
    Likes Received:
    1,933
    Trophy Points:
    453
    MBTI:
    Meh
    Enneagram:
    Meh
    I don't know much about personality types so I can't really say if I think INFJ's are better or worse, but I do think that they have the potential to be very good motivators. From what I've read on this forum, INFJ's (not to say it's not true of other types) want what's best for others and will do everything in their power to help them. I think INFJ's make could make good teachers and great educators (maybe that's why I'm becoming certified? I don't know). They know how to motivate people at a personal level.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  7. lostintranslation

    lostintranslation Community Member

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2009
    Threads:
    0
    Messages:
    300
    Likes Received:
    8
    Trophy Points:
    0
    MBTI:
    INFJ
    imo teachers that can relate to the INFJ type go out of their way to help students. As in, they're not just limited to the classroom; they show concern for students well-beings and want to help put theory into practice - this is how they measure their 'effectiveness', so to speak.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  8. OP
    bs98r3kjf

    bs98r3kjf Well-known member

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2009
    Threads:
    115
    Messages:
    2,745
    Likes Received:
    142
    Trophy Points:
    0
    MBTI:
    none
    Enneagram:
    none
    I agree with you. We are good motivators I think. And we do try hard to help everyone. That's part of why I'm studying education. The key word here is motivating people on a personal level. I think making learning more personal to a student allows them to reach a level where they would know how to apply what they learn to their lives, and I'm not simply talking about only applying it, but also sort of making it part of who they are and gosh its hard to explain. I know what I'm trying to say but I can't find the words to explain it. I think its because I see the word "teach" as something that is concrete and I see the word "educate" as something that I somewhat more abstract.
     
  9. NeverAmI

    NeverAmI Satisclassifaction
    Retired Staff

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2009
    Threads:
    197
    Messages:
    8,794
    Featured Threads:
    1
    Likes Received:
    949
    Trophy Points:
    0
    MBTI:
    INFP
    Enneagram:
    5w4
    I think INTJ or ENTJ would be typically better at teaching.

    For us INFJ's that have been through a lot, I think it would be considerably easier to educate. Education plays a big part in proper counseling as well, learning how to cope with daily issues and emotions. One of the cases where over analysis can actually have a great use.

    When I learn, I don't want someone that simply dribbles technical babble all day long. I want to see PRACTICAL use. I want to have stories and examples that show why there is any significance to these facts that are taught.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  10. OP
    bs98r3kjf

    bs98r3kjf Well-known member

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2009
    Threads:
    115
    Messages:
    2,745
    Likes Received:
    142
    Trophy Points:
    0
    MBTI:
    none
    Enneagram:
    none
    Yeah you have a good point. It does have to do with being an effective teacher/educator, especially when you're working with children because if you can reach them at that stage, it will come more naturally to them to sort of put everything into practice.
     
  11. IndigoSensor

    IndigoSensor Product Obtained
    Retired Staff

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2008
    Threads:
    762
    Messages:
    14,154
    Likes Received:
    1,297
    Trophy Points:
    0
    MBTI:
    INFJ
    Enneagram:
    1w2 sx/so/sp
    I agree. It's semantics to me.

    However, when I think about it a little. I see teaching as giving hard, factual information. Where as I see educating as passing on ideas, feelings, and thoughts. The former being more T, and the latter being more F.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  12. bamf

    bamf Is Watching You
    Retired Staff

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2009
    Threads:
    289
    Messages:
    10,794
    Likes Received:
    1,933
    Trophy Points:
    453
    MBTI:
    Meh
    Enneagram:
    Meh
    I totally agree with you (and thank you for making me reconsider the terms!) I think I know what you're trying to say; I'll try and think of the term for it, or at least the term I was taught.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  13. OP
    bs98r3kjf

    bs98r3kjf Well-known member

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2009
    Threads:
    115
    Messages:
    2,745
    Likes Received:
    142
    Trophy Points:
    0
    MBTI:
    none
    Enneagram:
    none
    hmmmm, what makes you say that INTJ or ENTJ would be better at teaching typically? i'm not disagreeing with you because i don't really know too much about those types, i'm just curious as to what you mean.

    yes teachers are also counselors in some ways, especially with the younger grades, i would assume.

    do you think infjs are good at demonstrating the practical use that you're talking about here? or do with think too abstractly to do that sometimes?
     
    #13 bs98r3kjf, Oct 28, 2009
    Last edited: Oct 28, 2009
  14. OP
    bs98r3kjf

    bs98r3kjf Well-known member

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2009
    Threads:
    115
    Messages:
    2,745
    Likes Received:
    142
    Trophy Points:
    0
    MBTI:
    none
    Enneagram:
    none

    I think this is kinda what I was thinking. I think educating sort of enables students to see the greater purposes behind what they are being taught. I see teaching as basically passing on info and some skills, like teaching how to add, how to read etc. And I see educating as helping your students think about more abstract things and thinking for themselves sort of, which can have very important applications in life.
     
  15. OP
    bs98r3kjf

    bs98r3kjf Well-known member

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2009
    Threads:
    115
    Messages:
    2,745
    Likes Received:
    142
    Trophy Points:
    0
    MBTI:
    none
    Enneagram:
    none
    No problem. At first sight, people think exactly the same. Let's look at the dictionary definition for each:

    ed⋅u⋅cate

    [​IMG] /ˈɛdʒ[​IMG]ʊˌkeɪt/ [​IMG] Show Spelled Pronunciation [ej-oo-keyt] [​IMG] Show IPA verb, -cat⋅ed, -cat⋅ing.Use educate in a Sentence

    See web results for educate

    See images of educate

    –verb (used with object) 1. to develop the faculties and powers of (a person) by teaching, instruction, or schooling. 2. to qualify by instruction or training for a particular calling, practice, etc.; train: to educate someone for law. 3. to provide schooling or training for; send to school. 4. to develop or train (the ear, taste, etc.): to educate one's palate to appreciate fine food. 5. to inform: to educate oneself about the best course of action.
    –verb (used without object) 6. to educate a person or group: A television program that educates can also entertain.


    teach

    [​IMG] /titʃ/ [​IMG] Show Spelled Pronunciation [teech] [​IMG] Show IPA verb, taught, teach⋅ing, noun Use teach in a Sentence

    See web results for teach

    See images of teach

    –verb (used with object) 1. to impart knowledge of or skill in; give instruction in: She teaches mathematics. 2. to impart knowledge or skill to; give instruction to: He teaches a large class.
    –verb (used without object) 3. to impart knowledge or skill; give instruction.
    –noun 4. Informal. teacher.



    from www.dictionary.com


    Do you see the difference even more right now?
     
  16. NeverAmI

    NeverAmI Satisclassifaction
    Retired Staff

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2009
    Threads:
    197
    Messages:
    8,794
    Featured Threads:
    1
    Likes Received:
    949
    Trophy Points:
    0
    MBTI:
    INFP
    Enneagram:
    5w4
    The thinking aspect is more emotionally detached, a lot of INTJ's I know are very good at knowing details and facts whether they have practical use or not.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
    #16 NeverAmI, Oct 28, 2009
    Last edited: Oct 28, 2009
  17. NeverAmI

    NeverAmI Satisclassifaction
    Retired Staff

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2009
    Threads:
    197
    Messages:
    8,794
    Featured Threads:
    1
    Likes Received:
    949
    Trophy Points:
    0
    MBTI:
    INFP
    Enneagram:
    5w4
    I was stating that education would have more to do with counseling than teaching would. But I would think puberty years would involve the most counseling in the teacher role. You have kids that are afraid to talk to their parents. Many of their friends may be bad influences, the only role that shows responsibility in their life other than that may be their teacher, so often you see the teenagers wanting to approach their teacher for guidance.

    I think INFJ's have some of the greatest potential to demonstrate practical use, if they can break out of their shell long enough to make links with their students.

    I think Restraint would have A LOT of insight on this entire topic.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  18. OP
    bs98r3kjf

    bs98r3kjf Well-known member

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2009
    Threads:
    115
    Messages:
    2,745
    Likes Received:
    142
    Trophy Points:
    0
    MBTI:
    none
    Enneagram:
    none

    yeah i know, i read it right but i typed it wrong, sorry, can you please edit that in the quote and ill edit it in my post, i don't want to confuse people.

    So would you say that details and facts are more important in the classroom than the bigger picture and more abstract ideas?
     
  19. OP
    bs98r3kjf

    bs98r3kjf Well-known member

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2009
    Threads:
    115
    Messages:
    2,745
    Likes Received:
    142
    Trophy Points:
    0
    MBTI:
    none
    Enneagram:
    none
    Hmmm, i guess it depends on the teacher's personality but if I were teaching puberty-aged kids, I don't think I'd be able to counsel them as I would be when it comes to younger children. But I guess that's different from person to person. It's probably because I'm better with younger ones and also because I feel like they're more trusting of me at that young age rather than the teenage years. But that's just me. Maybe it has to do with the fact that I had a tough childhood, and therefore feel the need to take care of others in that specific age. For others, its probably different.
     
  20. NeverAmI

    NeverAmI Satisclassifaction
    Retired Staff

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2009
    Threads:
    197
    Messages:
    8,794
    Featured Threads:
    1
    Likes Received:
    949
    Trophy Points:
    0
    MBTI:
    INFP
    Enneagram:
    5w4
    It depends on the student. Different people have different learning styles. In general, a teacher that is enthusiastic and can be animated and discuss complex theories in a simple to understand manner will be the most effective.

    As you have mentioned in the past, I believe getting the student personally engaged is the most important aspect in education and teaching. A lot of times that is established through creating an emotional link.

    Overall, they are both very important. A teacher that can retain facts and details, yet present them in a knoweldgeable manner that makes sense to the students and creates an emotional link will almost always meet with success.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
Loading...

Share This Page