Greek tragedy | INFJ Forum

Greek tragedy

Discussion in 'Philosophy and Religion' started by bs98r3kjf, Mar 8, 2009.

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  1. bs98r3kjf

    bs98r3kjf Well-known member

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    Is there anyone here who's into Greek tragedy and that type of literature?


     
  2. Creon

    Creon Community Member

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    I'm Greek, so I had to study Ancient Greek tragedy,philosophy and poetry during my university (and high school) years. But I'm not into it anymore.
     
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    #2 Creon, Mar 8, 2009
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2009
  3. OP
    bs98r3kjf

    bs98r3kjf Well-known member

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    oh ok, never mind then, i won't bother you about it, but thanks for replying. :)
     
  4. IncongruousIntimacy

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    Do you have a specific playwright or poet in mind? I've not enjoyed the paltry amount of Greek poetry Ive read, although that's mainly consisted of just one, Pindar. And I've only read two of their playwright's works. One of those being Aristophanes' 'The Clouds', which I was actually fervently disappointed with, seeing as how he is the most venerated comedy playwright of that time. The actual play though, lacked verbal eloquence, dynamic characters, and contained a turgid, drab plot.

    The other playwright, Sophocles I'd highly recommend. I've only read two from the Oedipus trilogy, but they were magnificent. The slow progression of Oedipus' sordid fate is done quite well. There is an assiduous theme of vision and fate throughout the two plays. From the point of Oedipus' physical rending of his eyes at the death of his wife (and mother) at the end of Oedipus Rex to him regaining his symbolic vision at his own comprehension of his soon death in Oedipus at Colonus. In other words it's simply Oedipus' spiritual quest to gaze into the azure sky, hight of the mountains, and to accept his fate, thereby permitting him to transcend his physical malady and become one with platonic vision (understanding) itself. This is an extremely short description of two terrific plays with many other philosophic ideas and themes imbued along the way.

    If I wasn't so lazy I'd read Antigone too. Anyway, sorry I have such limited knowledge of Greek literature, but I hope this at least helped.
     
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  5. Satya

    Satya C'est la vie
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    I loved Antigone. Any story where someone is destroyed by their own hubris is pretty awesome.
     
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    bs98r3kjf

    bs98r3kjf Well-known member

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    Thanks for your help.
    I'm an English lit minor and I have to read some Greek tragedy, which isn't exactly my strength. I'm having trouble starting them. The first one is Sophocles Oedipus Tyrannus/Rex/the King and the other is Euripides' Bacchae. I guess I just need some inspirational motivation to read them.
    Thanks for the info you've given me. So Oedipus' quest is basically to accept his fate. Is this similar to the concept of fate in The Iliad?

    hmmmm, I don't think we're reading Antigone this semester. But I think pride is always a common theme when it comes to this type of literature.
     

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