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Bigfoot more plausible?

Discussion in 'Science and Technology' started by Quinlan, Aug 8, 2008.

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  1. Quinlan

    Quinlan Right the First Time!

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    http://tvnz.co.nz/view/page/425822/1984424

    So researchers recently discovered 125,000 western lowland gorillas in an 47,000-square-kilometer area in the Congo. This means that the estimated population doubled overnight.

    This made me wonder, if that massive amount of gorillas (a well known species) can go unnoticed right under the noses of researchers, would it really be that surprising if small breeding groups of sasquatch were also going unnoticed in the deepest, darkest, most remote parts of North America? (especially since bigfoot's are probably quite solitary which makes their discovery even more difficult than gorillas travelling/living in groups).
     
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  2. Shai Gar

    Shai Gar Guest

    what ever made it implausable?'

    as i recall the platypus was laughed out of the scientific circles as a hoax...
     
  3. Satya

    Satya C'est la vie
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    Bigfoot is a hoax. :mrgreen:
     
  4. sumone

    sumone down the rabbit hole

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    Is not! :mrgreen:
     
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  5. alcyone

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    Does this mean that Nessie doesn't exist either? :(
     
  6. Satya

    Satya C'est la vie
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    She is more probable that Bigfoot.
     
  7. OP
    Quinlan

    Quinlan Right the First Time!

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    How so?
     
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  8. TheLastMohican

    TheLastMohican Captain Obvious
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    I ask also: how so?
    Dating back to 565, Nessie has been reported with wildly different appearances, and the inconsistent descriptions suddenly consolidated into a dinosaur-like form after the first discovery of an Apatosuarus skeleton. A few of the most intriguing sightings were conclusively attributed to sturgeons (one of which was shot in the water by a woman who thought it was Nessie). Active imaginations can provide almost all sightings. I recall a documentary in which a group of researchers sent a log floating out into the lake, and collected several supposed sightings of Nessie that were actually sightings of the log bobbing vertically (it was being controlled a cable, so as to appear like a neck from a distance). Of course, the sightings and their complementary sketches including imagined heads. Put together with the lack of convincing photographs or footage, this database is not terribly persuasive.

    Bigfoot, on other hand, has had remarkable consistency in its descriptions, and the Patterson-Gimlin film remains a powerful piece of evidence. (There are a few details that apparently rule out the possibility of it being footage of a man in a suit, such as the gait, muscle movement, irregularities of the fur, and the breadth of the shoulders.) There is a growing collection of footprints that have been analyzed, and Jeffrey Meldrum is very good at identifying the fakes. His studies have produced a large number of samples that could not be faked using special shoes. He also has found a percentage of defects and variations in the footprints that would be expected in the natural population. It all points to a small and as-of-yet-undiscovered population of bipedal apes. Indeed, I often wonder: is that so weird a hypothesis? The only reason it is scoffed at is because people apply some unjustified superstitious quality to the idea, as if a species that has not been captured retains a supernatural status. Come on, it's just an endangered species. We have plenty of them already.
     
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  9. Satya

    Satya C'est la vie
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    They are both very improbable, but if one were to exist, then I think the one that can hide underwater is more likely to exist.
     
  10. OP
    Quinlan

    Quinlan Right the First Time!

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    Couldn't have put it better myself DOY.

    Also take into account that Nessie is apparently isolated in one lake and bigfoot has an entire continent to hide in. So any searches of Nessie's habitat will be much more thorough than Bigfoot's. There is very little food available in the Loch for anything bigger than a Sturgeon whereas there is plenty of wilderness for an ape to survive in North America.

    Also if Bigfoot is real, then it would likely be our closest relative and therefore have near human intelligence, it would have keener senses than ours living its life out in the wild, so it would most likely know a human was around well before the Human saw it.

    So near human intelligence + strong senses + strong survival skills + massive areas of very remote wilderness = Almost impossible to find if it does exist.
     
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  11. OP
    Quinlan

    Quinlan Right the First Time!

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    So hiding in water (which can be scanned by sonar) > Hiding in dense and remote forest?
     
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  12. Satya

    Satya C'est la vie
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    Sonar is not a very effective means of locating marine life. Don't forget that most living things are composed of 70-90% water.
     
  13. TheLastMohican

    TheLastMohican Captain Obvious
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    Um...:Shocked:
     
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  14. Satya

    Satya C'est la vie
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    Well I guess that isn't always true.

    But maybe Nessie doesn't have an air-filled swim bladder.
     
  15. TheLastMohican

    TheLastMohican Captain Obvious
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    Wouldn't Nessie have lungs?
     
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  16. Satya

    Satya C'est la vie
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    Assuming she would be amphibian.

    Not as likely if she had gills.
     
  17. TheLastMohican

    TheLastMohican Captain Obvious
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    I am dubious about the implication that sharks are invisible to sonar.
     
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  18. OP
    Quinlan

    Quinlan Right the First Time!

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    Sharks don't have swim bladders but I'm pretty sure they get picked up by sonar.
     
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  19. Satya

    Satya C'est la vie
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    I'm right and you are wrong! [​IMG]
     
  20. Lurker

    Lurker Has nothing to destroy
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