job resignation | INFJ Forum

job resignation

Discussion in 'Education and Careers' started by invisible, May 3, 2015.

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  1. invisible

    On Holiday

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    The time has come for me to resign from my job. I've been with the company for almost 6 years and have contributed a lot of good quality work, but there are no promotion opportunities for me. My technical skills and qualifications are rapidly becoming too advanced for it to be worthwhile staying in the position. But worst of all, my relationship with my manager no longer works. I have lost respect for her too many times for the relationship to be repaired, and I'm finding it difficult to even speak to her. Still, I would like to leave on as good terms as possible.

    In a couple of months it will be possible for me to give my notice. I've heard that the best resignation letter says "I, [NAME], hereby resign from my position as [POSITION], and advise that my last day of work will be on [DATE]." and nothing else. I'm pretty comfortable with that, but I'm unsure of how to hand my resignation to my manager. Do I ask her to make a minute to speak to me, or do I just go up to her and say are you busy right now? Is it polite to give a brief explanation - I'm taking a break from work to focus on my studies? What are the right words to use when I hand that letter to her, to leave a good impression? I don't want to be emotional, I want to be professional.

    It would be cool to hear any stories or tips people have about leaving jobs on a good note. (Stories about leaving on a bad note also welcome.)
     
  2. Grayman

    Grayman Community Member

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    Just talked to my boss and said I was giving my two week notice. Told him that I was leaving because an opportunity opened up to make twice the amount of money. He became upset that I didn't ask him for more money and thought I was leaving because I was trying to get away from him or didn't like him or something. I told him that he couldn't pay me double the wages because his boss wouldn't go for that. He came back near the end of the week and told me I was right and acted unusually nice.

    In my first job it was expected that business was business and that I had to do what was best for me in the long haul in making a living. I had no issues leaving and was even encouraged to move to greater frontiers. It is interesting how some places expect some crazy amount of loyalty out of you like your whole life is to revolve around your job while another knows a job is just a job. I don't like how some places think they own their employees instead of seeing their employees as providing them a service.
     
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  3. Eventhorizon

    Eventhorizon Permanently relocated
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    Just give two weeks notice verbally to your direct boss. Then verbal and an email to an hr contact. Thank them if you feel like it.
     
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  4. floatingbridge

    floatingbridge Life's a ride
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    Actually, I have also quitted my part-time job of 7 years this year. Admittedly, I have been dropping hints about leaving for the past year verbally, but really, my employer full knew the real deal since he hired me [I was studying for a full-time career, etc.]


    I would hand that simple letter in saying, “Hi, do you have a minute, I have something important to discuss.” That drew attention straight away for me, and makes the situation more formal and serious if you like.


    I think the call for a verbal brief explanation to follow depends on your employer, certainly something brief and general like you’ve described is fair and polite. Certainly appropriate if you don’t want to burn bridges, and useful if you want to gain a referee.


    Overall, you might be overthinking about it a little. Good luck!
     
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  5. OP
    invisible

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    you are right, i am overthinking about it a little bit. i wish i could go into this situation in a natural way. but my history with my boss is long and i just need to formulate a clear script for myself so i can feel like i know how to act professionally in the situation, so the things that you are telling me are very helpful.
     
  6. Kgal

    Kgal Magic Star Dust
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    Keep in mind one of the characteristics of an INFJ is to avoid confrontation. That fact alone explains why so many of us struggle out there in world of employment when having to work with - or around - many people. I think that explains some of your angst at how to deal with your impending split with the company. It would be natural and normal to feel it within you.

    You - like [MENTION=7838]SpecialEdition[/MENTION] - give your best excellence to your job while noticing others doing nothing all day every day except get in the way of excellence. I too am noticing that where I work in that my Director of the whole clinic has no clue as to what's going on there and in retrospect I see where his lack of doing anything has impeded my performance on the job. Sigh. It's the way management has been for a long long time and is designed to attract those who wish to do nothing for a lot of money. All is required is the ability to be ruthless when it comes to making a profit. In other words - they have no problems with putting money - including their own - above employees welfare.

    If I were you I would not be worried about leaving on "good terms". If it is required that you give two weeks notice - then certainly give one - if it gets you anything.

    Over here in the US - we are not allowed to give out much information when called upon to find out how an employee was while working with us. All we can give out is the fact they worked there - and for what dates. That's it. Any other information and you might be sued if it impedes them from being hired elsewhere. I know...I've been the payroll/human resources clerk in a position where that happened.

    Some companies tie severence pay to giving two weeks notice. If this is an issue for you - by all means give it.

    I like your notice. Short. Sweet. To the Point. I see no need for you to explain anything to anyone there where you work. Over the years you've put forth much effort for little acknowledgement or satisfaction for you. Loyalty to the company has long passed from the history of our employment relationship with those at the top. 40 years ago it was lauded and supported. Those days are gone now....

    So there is no need for you to explain your self.

    Does she have a mailbox? Mail slot? Inbox? Secretary? If so - you can put your letter there. If she wants to talk with you about it - she will seek you out.

    For what it's worth - I have quit with notice - and without. In the end...it does not matter. People will react the way they always do when something doesn't go their way. Remember - it's all about THEM being inconvenienced.

    But for you....it's FREEDOM.
     
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  7. the

    the Si master race.
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    Id email it to her and CC yourself (your personal email of course) to get that time stamp on it.
     
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  8. SpecialEdition

    SpecialEdition THANKS RUG

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    Been there. Your resignation letter does not need to state anything other than exactly what you've written. When I left my job out west it was not something I wanted to do and I really wanted to stay there and with that company but it wasn't possible at that time, so I flowered it up a bit. Anywhere else that I've left I have just kept it very basic. They don't give a shit about the letter, they care that you are leaving and that they now have to replace you. You do not owe them any kind of explanation no matter what the circumstances.

    As to your timing... I like to do that kind of thing at the end of the day on the Friday. It just closes things out nicely before the weekend and anything else can be dealt with after a couple days off lol. I hand mine in face to face. I don't avoid it or hide from it. I usually go with "Hi _________, I just wanted to let you know that my last day will be on __________. Here's my letter of resignation so you have it in writing." I've done it via email, too, where I've announced my intention to leave and then I usually follow it up in writing on a physical piece of paper.
     
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    #8 SpecialEdition, May 3, 2015
    Last edited: May 3, 2015
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  9. Eventhorizon

    Eventhorizon Permanently relocated
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    I suppose I do not get a lot of this. I have worked in the IT sector a long while (not currently) and its simply known that people leave for positions that they are more interested in for whatever reason. You owe your employer nothing at all. If you want to leave them on good terms...provide 2 weeks notice. You were an employee they were an employer. ..a symbiotic relationship. I think way to many employees feel as if they owe the company they work for because they paid you and that somehow they were kind to you for giving you a job. Were you kind to them for working for them. For the extra time you put in but not getting paid? For the schedule changes that you had to accommodate and put your own life on hold for? No. The truth is if you did your job they were lucky to have you as an employee. Now, you dont rub their face in that, remain professional at all times. But also dont think you owe them anything at all other than the common courtesy of 2 weeks notice. Even that you dont owe them, its just a respected courtesy.
     
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  10. OP
    invisible

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    thanks very much all. your advice has really helped me to get things in perspective and feel a lot more comfortable about approaching the situation. i greatly appreciate the time you took to write these things to me.
     
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  11. Lerxst

    Lerxst Well-known member

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    Tell them face to face first, then submit the letter to make it official. Little tip though - write the letter first! The meeting can go either way depending on circumstances and you don't want to start writing a pissed-off resignation letter afterwards.
     
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