INFJ (but not exclusively) and temperament | INFJ Forum

INFJ (but not exclusively) and temperament

Discussion in 'Psychology and MBTI' started by Sam, Oct 11, 2009.

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  1. Sam

    Sam Regular Poster

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    I'm reading a fascinating book (temperament and school success, Liisa Keltikangas-Jarvinen) about temperaments (its effect especially in education) and it was quite enlightening for me to also recognise patterns from my own childhood and became curious to how much of our personalities are shaped by our temperaments. As the hypothesis is of course that the temperament is a "biological foundation" of sort to our personalities, I'm anxious to see about other INFJs thoughts and see if there is indeed correlation.

    Of course it's also very interesting to see other types' views on this as well, so all those interested do participate! :)

    Now this is just one definition about the manifested differences in our temperaments (and of course the fact not everyone is clearly this or that is taken into consideration, very few fall into extreme categories and the two may be more exaggarated in definition to clearly notice the difference.)

    This is a lot of text - I'm sorry about that!

    Now unfortunately I don't seem to be able to make that poll thing work, so I'll write the questions here (with as much personal commentory as you wish):

    1. Would you have considered yourself as highly sensitive or less sensitive?

    High sensitivity could be compared to radio antenna with the antenna always up, but instead of receiving one frequency at a time it receives all the frequencies at the same time. This child notices everything and suffers from physical alterations (smell, temperature, taste) to change in people's moods and feelings. So this descibes sensor sensitivity as sensitivity to other people: they easily perceive other people's feelings even if they're trying to hide them. That's why they're also very emphathetic. And it makes these children very sensitive to criticism, as well: not one critique goes unnoticed by them.

    Low sensitivity is then exactly the opposite. They don't seem to be bothered if it's hot or cold, noisy or smelly, or if a shirt itches them. They don't notice different tastes as easily and takes risks more likely than a child with high sensitivity (because they're not worried about injuring themselves as much). Socially they're not probably very skilled or perceptive: these kids can't necessarily read social cues or interpret them as well as more sensitive kid. This child doesn't understand that what is said can be completely different than what is actually meant. This kid isn't as easily hurt, because this child doesn't necessarily even notice the critique.

    2. Would you have considered yourself as a highly active or less active?

    High activity: This shows especially in the amount of energy that goes into external activities. Activity is how much strength or "vitality" is used in the activity at hand. It appears in how fast the person talks or eats, how powerfully (s)he moves, how much hands he uses when (s)he talks, does (s)he present him/herself calmly or is everything "loud". High activity creates great enthusiasm and interest towards life. Very active child tends to separate him/herself and become independent sooner than a child with lower activity. This child practises his/her motor skills constantly and often likes sports that use the bigger muscles in the body. Active child needs to be moving all the time.

    Low activity:
    This isn't a synonym to lack of energy. It appears in slowness. It takes a while, before clothes can be put on, to eat etc. If a child is lesser active, (s)he usually learns how to ride a bike, jump on one foot, ski etc. later than more active child. This child doesn't much like hobbies that require motor skills or are based on strength. As opposed to physical hobbies, this child prefers calm and quiet ones. This child practises subtle motor skills (?) and is often very good at these. This child draws and tinkers more than his/hers more active friend.

    3. Would you have considered yourself as a highly adaptable or less adaptable?

    High adaptability: Literally means how well one adapts to changes, how long it takes to get used to them and how hard one resists to all things new. If a person is highly adaptable, it's easy for him/her to change the way things are done and adapt to new ways. Surprises don't make this child nervous, and (s)he is able to remain his/her calm in unexpected situations. This child usually "goes with the flow". (S)he does what everyone else and does what is told. This child is flexible in situations.

    Low adaptability: Need to stick to what is known and familiar. Surprises and unexpected occurrences cause anxiety. This child likes predictability and repetition. Even the smallest changes are difficult and sudden change in schedule can mess up the whole day. If child is lesser adaptable, all transitional stages are going to be difficult for him/her. This child resists even the smallest changes and changes are overwhelming to him/her. A child with lower adaptability needs a clear "personal space". This child struggles and downright hates if another human being comes physically or emotionally to his/her territory or too close. This child likes routines.

    4. Would you have considered yourself as more resilient or lesser resilient?


    High resilience: "Toughness" and "persistence". Once something is started it will be finished, no matter how long it takes. A child who is highly resilient may have difficulty ending a task when it's time if the task isn't finished - it would still bother him/her in his/her mind. Resilient child doesn't get frustrated easily and eagerly play alone or stay behind to "finish the play" by themselves when others have moved on to something else. Resilient person sticks to opinions and views, which can also manifest itself as stubborness.

    Low resilience: Can lead easily to giving up. Children with low resilience have a hard time working on with the same thing for a long time, and they change from one activity to another unless they achieve their goals. These children aren't as determined to learn new skills as more resilient children. Same play won't interest them for long, new hobby soon loses its interest, book to read can't be too thick and even the most interesting tv-show soon becomes boring. These children frustrate easily. Jumping from one activity to another is usually a sign of the child wanting to reduce the uncomfortability of boredom. Low resilience may slow down the independence process from parents as all kinds of obstacles and delays annoy and frustrate the child, which leads this kid to lean for support from parental figures.

    5. Would you have considered yourself as a highly predictable or less predictable?

    High predictability: This basically refers to physiological predictability. This means that the child eats and sleeps rhytmically. This child wants to go to bed each night at the same time and needs routine in eating, or else (s)he'll become irritated and get a headache.

    Low predictability: There's little predictability of this child's physiological activity. This child sleeps and goes to bed at different times each day. (S)he can get hungry at the most bizarre hours of the day etc. This child has a tendency for disorganisation. Things are wherever and are to be found from wherever they're left. Desk is often unorganised and even though when it's cleaned, it'll get messy very soon again as this child is not good at maintaining it organised.

    6. Would you have considered yourself as highly intense or less intense?

    High intensity: This basically refers to the force with we express our moods and feelings. It doesn't necessarily refer to the difference in the feeling itself but in how strongly we express it. These children are dramatic, their joy is bigger and their sadness deeper than those of lesser intense children. They overreact and express all their feelings to outside, whether they're happy or angry. The caretaker never has to guess how the child is feeling. These children are able to be overwhelmed with joy as well as get angry and erupt like volcanoes. They cry and laugh a lot.

    Lower intesity: This child has calmer, quieter and more controlled means of expression with their emotions. It's hard to guess what is going on inside of the mind of lesser intense child, or what (s)he's feeling or experiencing. (S)he's always stable. (S)he rarely cries and laughs so hard it's impossible to stop. This child is likely to go through life without any extreme emotions.
     
  2. Gaze

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    Interesting stuff. Love to see other responses.
     
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  3. AUM

    AUM The Romantic Scientist

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    In a scale from 1 to 10(1 being low on that temperament and 10 high)

    1. Sensitivity-10
    2. Activeness-5
    3. Adaptivity- 3
    4. Resilience- 7
    5. Predictability- 7
    6. Intensity- 5
     
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  4. Orion

    Orion Strength through understanding
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    Hmm, I dunno. I wasn't very aware of anything when I was younger. I wasn't interested by other people or external events. I lived in my head. But I was very easily hurt/scared by people and words.

    Not active at all. Slow to do things etc. But man, how I've changed!

    Middle ground again. I can change and adapt and my tolerance to pain and anxiety in this area is fairly strong but... I definitely don't like it and will almost always prefer routine and familiar patterns that are reliable.

    Very resilient. Probably a tad too much, even when I was younger. Insane amount of patience.

    I was/am very predictable, lol.

    This is funny because I would call myself extremely intense. Intense beyond belief, but you wouldn't know about it. I don't express it easily or openly. When I was younger, I had so much going on but it never occured to me to express it to others or ask for help. I never asked for help and no one ever knew any different.
     
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  5. OP
    Sam

    Sam Regular Poster

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    That's one way to assess! Thanks for the response, and oh I'm interested in the responses as well - I don't remember coming across research made on MBTI types and temperament (if someone knows?)

    Mine:

    1. Definately a highly sensitive child. All the way.

    2. I was more on the side of an active child - highly excitable, did a lot of sports and very enthuasiastic (this doesn't however change the fact I was drawn to solitary activities and didn't always need people around me to be excited about something, or that it somehow removes introversion).

    3. Definately low adaptability. All the way.

    4. This I'm not so sure about. But I'd say as far as my mentality goes, more resilient although easily distracted and motivation had a lot to do with how resilient I was going to be (e.g. learnt helplessness and low self-belief&esteem in coping with mathematics). But towards task completion - definately yes.

    5. As highly predictable as it friggin gets.

    6. This is actually what I was thinking about. I'd say I was definately highly intense - and also being highly sensitive - is not necessarily an easy combo.
     
  6. Orion

    Orion Strength through understanding
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    Tell me about it!
     
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  7. Nela

    Nela Community Member

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    I'll copy that one! (I know I'm lazy).

    1. Sensitivity-10+
    2. Activeness-6
    3. Adaptivity- 3
    4. Resilience- 6
    5. Predictability- 6
    6. Intensity- 7
     
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  8. Stephanie

    Stephanie Regular Poster

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    MBTI:
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    Highly Sensitive
    Low Activity
    Low Adaptability
    High Resilience
    High Predictability
    High Intensity

    And agree that it is tough to be highly sensitive and have high intensity. The funny thing about my activity as a child, is that I had really long thick hair, and my mum thinks that it was too heavy for me to be very active, apparently when I got it cut I would get more energy, but I still don't think I was all that active. I prefered to read or play with my imagination rather than run around and play sports, but I've always been quite animated and talk with my hands . . . maybe I fell closer to the middle.
     
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