I so disagree with this. There are too many other options. Your opinion? | INFJ Forum

Featured I so disagree with this. There are too many other options. Your opinion?

Discussion in 'Psychology and MBTI' started by just me, Feb 8, 2018.

Share This Page

Watchers:
This thread is being watched by 7 users.
More threads by just me
  1. just me

    just me Air and Water

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2009
    Threads:
    191
    Messages:
    11,132
    Featured Threads:
    7
    Likes Received:
    2,787
    Trophy Points:
    594
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    SE USA
    MBTI:
    infj
    Psychologist Abraham Maslow wrote, In any given moment we have two options: to step forward into growth or to step back into safety.

    Are these so opposite? Are these so much the only choices? I cannot believe a psychologist wrote this, unless they were possibly using it as an example to help someone for some life circumstance. I can find where it could possibly be useful at times to some people in some circumstances, but cannot truly see it as a rule.

    Anyone wish to chime in?

     
  2. acd

    acd Well-known member

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2009
    Threads:
    131
    Messages:
    12,001
    Featured Threads:
    8
    Likes Received:
    12,607
    Trophy Points:
    825
    MBTI:
    infp
    Enneagram:
    9w8 sp/sx
    I think we can learn a lot by facing certain things that make us uncomfortable.
     
  3. Gaze

    Donor

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2009
    Threads:
    2,317
    Messages:
    28,302
    Featured Threads:
    71
    Likes Received:
    20,185
    Trophy Points:
    1,494
    MBTI:
    .
    It's often the case that when we don't push ourselves, we don't learn or grow, and become complacent, sitting pretty so to speak, and never stepping out of our comfort zones. Sometimes, when we stay "safe", we don't challenge ourselves, improve, or build our confidence in new skills or areas. So, why can't this be a rule? Yes, sometimes, we may choose to stay within the bounds of what we feel we can do or achieve, because it's in our control and known limits. Nothing is wrong with this, but I think it's easier to be too comfortable, and then lose out on learning and growing. I'm living this right now. I'm dealing with situations that make me uncomfortable. It's tougher than I expected. I don't like the stress of it, but I'm learning things that are important for me to learn, that I wouldn't otherwise know or understand if I didn't put myself in those situations. It may be forced growth, but it's necessary growth, even if it's painful ;)
     
    just me, Ren, Sandie33 and 3 others like this.
  4. Wyote

    Wyote Humanistic Reductionist
    Staff Member Administrator

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2008
    Threads:
    202
    Messages:
    14,232
    Featured Threads:
    8
    Likes Received:
    34,012
    Trophy Points:
    2,999
    Gender:
    Male
    MBTI:
    Ni Space
    Enneagram:
    9 Seas
    I think it is true in principle but can also be easily misinterpreted. It is rarely a black and white choice. Choosing safety almost seems like a negative given the two options but I think that choice is sometimes the right path. I think a more positive duality would be to progress or rest. We are usually in a state of flow trying to balance the two. Keep growing and stay safe.
     
  5. Isabella

    Isabella Probably dancing....

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2013
    Threads:
    3
    Messages:
    1,769
    Likes Received:
    3,910
    Trophy Points:
    465
    Gender:
    Female
    MBTI:
    INFJ
    Enneagram:
    3SleepEo
    Coincidences....I was only thinking about "comfortableness" yesterday and was going to write something in my blog but shall post here:

    If you know someone who often takes the most comfortable approach, it's never good to advise them to do the thing that they feel is most comfortable for them. Some people need to learn to be flexible and stretch themselves.

    Sometimes to step back into safety isn't necessarily a place of safety - there's so much MORE to this statement.
     
    Tin Man, just me, Gaze and 4 others like this.
  6. invisible

    invisible Bites. Hard.

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2009
    Threads:
    221
    Messages:
    10,122
    Featured Threads:
    7
    Likes Received:
    12,214
    Trophy Points:
    1,339
    Gender:
    Male
    MBTI:
    INFJ-A / EII
    Enneagram:
    5
    Map
    Agree with OP. This statement is so simplistic that it is useless for general purpose. You can step in other directions than forward and back. You can also step into things other than safety or growth - destruction, for example.
     
    #6 invisible, Feb 8, 2018
    Last edited: Feb 8, 2018
    Tin Man, just me, Isabella and 5 others like this.
  7. the

    the Si master race.

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2009
    Threads:
    468
    Messages:
    14,031
    Featured Threads:
    7
    Likes Received:
    7,753
    Trophy Points:
    710
    MBTI:
    ISTJ
    Enneagram:
    9w1
    Seems like something from one of those mom groups on Facebook.
     
    Wyote, Ren and invisible like this.
  8. invisible

    invisible Bites. Hard.

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2009
    Threads:
    221
    Messages:
    10,122
    Featured Threads:
    7
    Likes Received:
    12,214
    Trophy Points:
    1,339
    Gender:
    Male
    MBTI:
    INFJ-A / EII
    Enneagram:
    5
    Map
    Naughty comparison... It has got that kind of hokey, platitude, inspirational feel though yeah.

    It is kind of inspirational I guess... like for the right situation or whatever...
     
  9. invisible

    invisible Bites. Hard.

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2009
    Threads:
    221
    Messages:
    10,122
    Featured Threads:
    7
    Likes Received:
    12,214
    Trophy Points:
    1,339
    Gender:
    Male
    MBTI:
    INFJ-A / EII
    Enneagram:
    5
    Map
    IDK it's weird you see a lot of quotes around from famous people or a historical scholar or an expert in their field or something. It's as though the fact that such a person said some thing validates it with truth value. But that's not necessarily the case at all. You see good ones and bad ones. Smart people are humans too and they have silly ideas and make trite remarks. Maybe they just want to help someone. I think a remark like this could help a lot of people, in the right circumstances. Be brave, be daring, have courage! It can be very difficult to summon those kinds of heroic type approaches.
     
    Tin Man, just me, Wyote and 1 other person like this.
  10. Ren

    Ren πηγή ◌

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2017
    Threads:
    10
    Messages:
    1,018
    Featured Threads:
    5
    Likes Received:
    4,349
    Trophy Points:
    670
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Geneva
    MBTI:
    INFJ
    Enneagram:
    5w4
    Map
    Good point invisible :) The appeal to authority is one extensively used form of fallacious argument.

    And the OP statement is an example of a false dilemma, as you pointed out above with your reference to destruction.

    Logic is very cold but it can be terribly effective at unmasking these kinds of "arguments". Though sometimes the debates and observations they spark can be very insightful in and of themselves.
     
    #10 Ren, Feb 8, 2018
    Last edited: Feb 8, 2018
    Tin Man, Lady Jolanda, Wyote and 2 others like this.
  11. Sloe Djinn

    Sloe Djinn Idiot with Internet Access

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2010
    Threads:
    121
    Messages:
    3,964
    Featured Threads:
    6
    Likes Received:
    3,970
    Trophy Points:
    475
    MBTI:
    SOCMOB
    Enneagram:
    .
    I'll remember this the next time I feel road rage. No I didn't ram them officer, I was growing.

    But yeah I think it doesn't apply to every situation. I tried to find a passage that had more of the surrounding text (to try to look at the context) but couldn't find anything in a basic search. I'm not all that shocked about it though. I bet Maslow could have illuminated it, and even if not, it's not a rule that psych researchers stick adamantly to such an assertion for the rest of their lives. He may have agreed with the OP were he alive now for all we know.
     
  12. Wyote

    Wyote Humanistic Reductionist
    Staff Member Administrator

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2008
    Threads:
    202
    Messages:
    14,232
    Featured Threads:
    8
    Likes Received:
    34,012
    Trophy Points:
    2,999
    Gender:
    Male
    MBTI:
    Ni Space
    Enneagram:
    9 Seas
    lmfao

    [​IMG]
     
    Ren likes this.
  13. Professor Snep

    Professor Snep Community Member

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2017
    Threads:
    0
    Messages:
    682
    Likes Received:
    2,062
    Trophy Points:
    386
    MBTI:
    Potions
    Enneagram:
    OBLIVIATE
    Ideally, it's the same.
     
    Wyote likes this.
  14. the

    the Si master race.

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2009
    Threads:
    468
    Messages:
    14,031
    Featured Threads:
    7
    Likes Received:
    7,753
    Trophy Points:
    710
    MBTI:
    ISTJ
    Enneagram:
    9w1
    Forward and Up are typically good places to move to, I think especially so when you have a plan laid out and are moving forward in the direction you want to go.
    Side to Side is seen as stagnation.
    Back and Down are typically the bad ways to go. Moving backwards in this case is said to be a safe move (but still negative), which I think is atypical. This leads me to believe that some context has been left out.
     
    Wyote likes this.
  15. OP
    just me

    just me Air and Water

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2009
    Threads:
    191
    Messages:
    11,132
    Featured Threads:
    7
    Likes Received:
    2,787
    Trophy Points:
    594
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    SE USA
    MBTI:
    infj
    [​IMG]

    When first viewed, how many triangles do we see at first glance? Do we notice one at first glance? Four? Without counting or trying to see how many, how many jump out at you? I saw four at first glance in a second, but more as time ticked.

    First four I saw was because of this in my brain:upload_2018-2-12_21-6-47.png The rest came with counting and looking.

    I believe each of us have different potentials, skills, thoughts, paths, etc. So far, the answer that comes as close to my way of thinking is post #6, @invisible . Many other answers have helped open my mind to better understanding others. I need this.

    Thinking about it, as @Sloe Djinn noted, I believe he could well be correct in his thoughts:
    "But yeah I think it doesn't apply to every situation. I tried to find a passage that had more of the surrounding text (to try to look at the context) but couldn't find anything in a basic search. I'm not all that shocked about it though. I bet Maslow could have illuminated it, and even if not, it's not a rule that psych researchers stick adamantly to such an assertion for the rest of their lives. He may have agreed with the OP were he alive now for all we know."

    It can take a lot of Courage to step upon the water. It takes more than Courage has to stay afloat. Some people have neither and may find it better not to step forward.
     
    Wyote and invisible like this.
  16. the

    the Si master race.

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2009
    Threads:
    468
    Messages:
    14,031
    Featured Threads:
    7
    Likes Received:
    7,753
    Trophy Points:
    710
    MBTI:
    ISTJ
    Enneagram:
    9w1
    Guys, what about going DIAGONALLY?
     
    Sloe Djinn and Stu like this.
  17. Tin Man

    Tin Man "a respectable amount of screaming"

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2012
    Threads:
    27
    Messages:
    3,794
    Featured Threads:
    1
    Likes Received:
    4,018
    Trophy Points:
    485
    MBTI:
    INTJ
    Enneagram:
    N
    Indeed. I had someone quote Einstein to me the other day. But the quote was proved to be wrongly attributed to him. So he was trying to prove his point by appealing to an authority figure he was incorrectly quoting.

    I would have a field day, but he was my boss's boss. So I had to shut my mouth, and just nod.
     
    invisible and just me like this.
  18. Faye

    Faye ^_^
    Staff Member Administrator

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2009
    Threads:
    303
    Messages:
    7,006
    Featured Threads:
    2
    Likes Received:
    2,902
    Trophy Points:
    490
    Gender:
    Female
    MBTI:
    INFJ
    Enneagram:
    4w5
    I thought Maslow's whole thing was that we cannot grow until we are safe. That is why he put safety as the foundation of the hierarchy of needs while self-actualization was the top of it.

    Self-actualization is not so important if your life is in danger.
     
    Wyote and just me like this.
  19. OP
    just me

    just me Air and Water

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2009
    Threads:
    191
    Messages:
    11,132
    Featured Threads:
    7
    Likes Received:
    2,787
    Trophy Points:
    594
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    SE USA
    MBTI:
    infj
    [​IMG]

    This diagonal line leads to the bathroom, other rooms, and the wall.
     
    #19 just me, Feb 13, 2018
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2018
  20. OP
    just me

    just me Air and Water

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2009
    Threads:
    191
    Messages:
    11,132
    Featured Threads:
    7
    Likes Received:
    2,787
    Trophy Points:
    594
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    SE USA
    MBTI:
    infj
    Safety says a lot. Many people are walking around feeling and living: thinking unsafely. Many are paranoid about safety. We, as a people, should find a need for safety as a foundation for growth. Therefore, safety is growth for a lot of people.

    Almost like taking in a dog that has been beaten and starved. That dog needs to feel safe before he, she can even be itself. And as said in the movie, "Fifth Element", she needs your love. People can be fragile and need lots of help.

    If I may say, I think a lot of people could possibly step forward(sideways, up) into safety.
     
    the and Wyote like this.
Loading...

Share This Page