How does culture affect communication? | INFJ Forum

How does culture affect communication?

Discussion in 'History, Travel, and Culture' started by Gaze, Feb 24, 2016.

Share This Page

Watchers:
This thread is being watched by 6 users.
More threads by Gaze
  1. Gaze

    Donor

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2009
    Threads:
    2,379
    Messages:
    28,224
    Featured Threads:
    93
    Likes Received:
    22,459
    Trophy Points:
    1,906
    MBTI:
    INFPishy
    Since we're all from different parts of the world, how do you think living our own cultures affects how we communicate or interact with people who are similar or different from us? What are the biggest differences you've noticed across cultures when you've traveled or visited other places? Does it make you miss your own culture or does it make you want to live somewhere else?
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  2. writerinchief

    writerinchief Community Member

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2015
    Threads:
    6
    Messages:
    297
    Likes Received:
    71
    Trophy Points:
    0
    MBTI:
    INTP
    I'm 99.9... percent (and of course I couldn't just write 100 percent) sure that living in America impacts my style of communication with other people from other countries.

    And so I think the biggest thing that distinguishes me as an American whenever I travel is the American innocence I have. I see a certain sort of naivety, this optimism in the American dream and in other similar ideas, in the texts written by American authors I'm reading for history and English, and it's fascinating. After all, in order to believe in the American dream, I have to be asleep.
     
    #2 writerinchief, Feb 24, 2016
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2016
    Wyote likes this.
  3. JJJA

    JJJA Permanent Fixture

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2015
    Threads:
    35
    Messages:
    1,121
    Featured Threads:
    2
    Likes Received:
    480
    Trophy Points:
    667
    MBTI:
    Stoned
    Enneagram:
    1
    The American dream to some more different cultures is more of a nightmare for them. I'll choose the American dream over a much worse reality.
     
    Kim Spencer likes this.
  4. OP
    Gaze

    Donor

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2009
    Threads:
    2,379
    Messages:
    28,224
    Featured Threads:
    93
    Likes Received:
    22,459
    Trophy Points:
    1,906
    MBTI:
    INFPishy
    Do people treat you differently because of that "innocence"? And do your experiences reflect that cultures without this innocence are more cynical or fatalistic or just more realistic?
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  5. writerinchief

    writerinchief Community Member

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2015
    Threads:
    6
    Messages:
    297
    Likes Received:
    71
    Trophy Points:
    0
    MBTI:
    INTP
    When I visit my relatives, there is definitely that undertone of "oh, she's so naive, she doesn't actually know what the real world is," and I think another part of that is that we have so many material comforts as Americans, and people can fall into the trap of equating material superiority with inherent superiority. So quotes like the one above are a backlash to that. Possibly.

    As for the second part of your question, I think each country has its own myths that determine its identity. As a result, some countries might not have equivalents to the American Dream, but they might have other myths that are similar in the fact that they create a more positive illusion of the people in that country and of the country itself than reality.
     
    Gaze likes this.
  6. flower

    flower

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2014
    Threads:
    33
    Messages:
    8,996
    Featured Threads:
    9
    Likes Received:
    36,695
    Trophy Points:
    3,056
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    Nordic
    MBTI:
    INFJ
    Enneagram:
    9w1 sx
    I live in a country where small talk is almost nonexistent, thus it's not valued. Our culture is generally cold and distant. People really don't talk to strangers if they don't know who they are personally. It might have something to do with this brutally cold climate when people are inside of their homes most of the year because of the cold weather and darkness outside. Here, people value and respect their own personal space A LOT, also others' too. Kind of paradise for introverts but in some ways it makes people more lonely, because of the distance between the individuals. Like a complete opposite of US or even some other places of Europe even, where people are generally more ''open'' and receptive towards others/strangers. It's hard to explain... It doesn't mean that people don't talk here, not at all! It's just that people speak if they only have something really important to say, then there can be lots of talking, lol. We are just more reserved and take longer time to warm up~ It's kinda common that if you say something here, it might be taken more seriously (*cough* I have still something to learn about this, to not take everything that people say so seriously :p).
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
    Sandie33, Ginny, koizora and 2 others like this.
  7. #@&5&49

    #@&5&49 Well-known member

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2012
    Threads:
    91
    Messages:
    4,278
    Featured Threads:
    7
    Likes Received:
    3,139
    Trophy Points:
    912
    MBTI:
    Inf?
    I was raised in a multicultural family. People speaking different languages, people visiting from other countries, some didn't speak English. I've also had friends from different countries. I love cultural exchanges. A great opportunity to expand my perception. Crossing cultural boundaries takes a lot of open mindedness, listening, flexibility, respect, and curiosity. The thing is, is to meet people who feel the same way. When I travel I meet a lot of people who dislike Americans. That's kind of a drag.

    It's so easy to offend people from cultures different than my own simply because I don't understand their cultural rules. I always appreciate it when people take the time to tell me things like, in my country we see that as offensive, we do this instead. As long as I know the social rules, I can adapt. It's figuring those out that's tough. But then, I have a hard time figuring those out sometimes in my native country.
     
    koizora and seira0807 like this.
  8. Sriracha

    Sriracha Not here.
    Banned

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2011
    Threads:
    98
    Messages:
    3,458
    Likes Received:
    1,911
    Trophy Points:
    375
    MBTI:
    ISFJ
    That wouldn't work for me. I love to joke and tease strangers. I was at the park the other day taking photos (that I can use for painting.) I was taking a picture of a saguaro cactus and this old man walks by saying (to the cactus) "Now hold real still!" I was laughing. I said: "Thanks, that was my best subject yet!" I love where I live.
     
  9. flower

    flower

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2014
    Threads:
    33
    Messages:
    8,996
    Featured Threads:
    9
    Likes Received:
    36,695
    Trophy Points:
    3,056
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    Nordic
    MBTI:
    INFJ
    Enneagram:
    9w1 sx
    Lol, cute!

    Sometimes this place is really suffocating place to live because of all the seriousness and coldness. It's not easy. Joking and teasing is a fun part of life after all...
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  10. acd

    acd jezi baba

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2009
    Threads:
    141
    Messages:
    14,671
    Featured Threads:
    10
    Likes Received:
    29,894
    Trophy Points:
    1,377
    MBTI:
    infp
    Enneagram:
    9w8 sp/sx
    It is interesting to see it, here. People reside in different parts of the world with different cultural norms, but we interpret others through our cultural lens. I have a lot of examples in mind from this forum where people misunderstood or misjudged one another due to this.
     
  11. OP
    Gaze

    Donor

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2009
    Threads:
    2,379
    Messages:
    28,224
    Featured Threads:
    93
    Likes Received:
    22,459
    Trophy Points:
    1,906
    MBTI:
    INFPishy
    Could you give a few general examples without calling out anyone? ;)
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
    acd likes this.
  12. acd

    acd jezi baba

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2009
    Threads:
    141
    Messages:
    14,671
    Featured Threads:
    10
    Likes Received:
    29,894
    Trophy Points:
    1,377
    MBTI:
    infp
    Enneagram:
    9w8 sp/sx
    No, lol. But they are there.
     
  13. JJJA

    JJJA Permanent Fixture

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2015
    Threads:
    35
    Messages:
    1,121
    Featured Threads:
    2
    Likes Received:
    480
    Trophy Points:
    667
    MBTI:
    Stoned
    Enneagram:
    1
    Could you perhaps give at least one example? I'm itching to know.
     
    acd likes this.
  14. writerinchief

    writerinchief Community Member

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2015
    Threads:
    6
    Messages:
    297
    Likes Received:
    71
    Trophy Points:
    0
    MBTI:
    INTP
    Shoot, now the mystery will plague us forever. I second (or third?) what [MENTION=1669]Gist[/MENTION] and [MENTION=13855]JJJA[/MENTION] wrote: could you give us an example at the very least? It doesn't have to be specific, and it doesn't have to call anyone out. Something general will do.

    I know personally, I'm curious to see if I do some of the things you thought about when you wrote your comments.
     
    acd likes this.
  15. OP
    Gaze

    Donor

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2009
    Threads:
    2,379
    Messages:
    28,224
    Featured Threads:
    93
    Likes Received:
    22,459
    Trophy Points:
    1,906
    MBTI:
    INFPishy
    Alrighty. Be that way :m067::D. J/k, it's all good chica.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  16. Peppermint

    Peppermint Well-known member

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2009
    Threads:
    27
    Messages:
    3,918
    Featured Threads:
    1
    Likes Received:
    9,212
    Trophy Points:
    877
    MBTI:
    uwot
    Enneagram:
    _

    [​IMG]
     

    Attached Files:

    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
    flower likes this.
  17. the

    the Si master race.
    Banned

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2009
    Threads:
    479
    Messages:
    14,392
    Featured Threads:
    9
    Likes Received:
    8,768
    Trophy Points:
    1,112
    MBTI:
    ISTJ
    Enneagram:
    9w1
    Well there is that group that only has present tense language and they are very content. Starts with a p I think.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
    acd likes this.
  18. Flavus Aquila

    Flavus Aquila Finding My Place in the Sun
    Banned

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2009
    Threads:
    323
    Messages:
    10,047
    Featured Threads:
    49
    Likes Received:
    5,599
    Trophy Points:
    1,102
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Australia
    MBTI:
    INTJ - A
    Enneagram:
    10000
    Being Australian is significant when I am overseas. Practicality is valued here; any signs of affectation, ceremoniousness, etc. are generally regarded with irritation. There is a sharp distinction between formal occasions and all other occasions.

    When I'm overseas I sometimes get annoyed with what I see as officiousness and unnecessary social ceremony. But I just have to remind myself that Australia is a different place which is not pertinent at the moment, so I'll address people as sir, maam, etc. and observe the 1001 little rules which don't seem to have any practical purpose, without trying to reform them.

    Despite my conscious effort, I often fail to observe certain communication protocols overseas, which sets people shuffling and fiddling with their hands. Eventually, again despite my conscious effort, this seems to polarise people into thinking that I am either callous, or friendly. As a general pattern I have noticed, my lack of certain formalities endears me to superiors and subordinates, but infuriates peers.
     
    seira0807 likes this.
  19. BrokenDaniel

    Infraction Bin

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2014
    Threads:
    8
    Messages:
    746
    Likes Received:
    126
    Trophy Points:
    150
    MBTI:
    ISFP ESI
    Enneagram:
    4w5 Sx/Sp
    Actually were i live, Chile, is a fairly social place, but comparatively we're cold and mistrustful to the vast majority of the latin population. We are nowhere near as Brazilians, and Cubans, those guys could just meet you in the streets, get wasted together, crash into your house, hit on your sister, sleep in your couch and make you breakfast in the morning to make peaces and fare thee well as if they always knew you. Boundaries are a completely foreign word to most of them. Fun to be around though.
    Also in my case, i come from a family of 20th century immigrants from both sides and that kind of colors those nuances. There are certain things in my country that bother me and never related to in any way. Also traditional things that i've never got introduced to, ironically enough.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
    #19 BrokenDaniel, Feb 29, 2016
    Last edited: Feb 29, 2016
    Gaze and seira0807 like this.
  20. ImaginaryBloke

    ImaginaryBloke Well-known member

    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2015
    Threads:
    60
    Messages:
    2,428
    Featured Threads:
    3
    Likes Received:
    3,829
    Trophy Points:
    440
    Gender:
    Male
    MBTI:
    INTP
    Enneagram:
    Tri 5-9-4
    Yes, but "Australia, Australia, Australia, we love you" (~2:00).

    [video=youtube;_f_p0CgPeyA]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_f_p0CgPeyA[/video]
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
Loading...

Share This Page