How do INFJ leaders influence individuals? | INFJ Forum

How do INFJ leaders influence individuals?

Discussion in 'Psychology and MBTI' started by Satya, Jun 20, 2009.

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  1. Satya

    Satya C'est la vie
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    A human group is not a collective; it is an assortment of individuals. Each individual makes their own choices, good or bad, despite the reality that the entire group often has to deal with the consequences. Humans also tend to need incentives in which to lead them to act in one way or anther, so it falls to the leader of the group to find a way to get individuals to want to do what the leader wants. There are a number of ways a leader can create incentive such as fear, inspiration, organization, etc. My question is how would an INFJ leader influence individuals? How would they create incentives?
     
  2. J. Cardigan

    J. Cardigan Community Member

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    Every time I've been put into a leadership position (which, admittedly, is not often), I find that confidence speaks louder than anything else. When you know you're right, and everyone else knows you know you're right, no one will question you.

    Delivering a solid message and having a powerful demeanor will take one a long way.
     
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  3. ca10

    ca10 One

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    An INFJ leader would lead by example to inspire his subordinates. Different people have different motivations for doing things, so an INFJ would probably try to get to know each individual and find out what makes them tick.
     
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  4. Grey Wolf

    Grey Wolf Airborne all the way!

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    i'm not sure how, or why, but I seem to be able to lead without being the leader. For example, back in my scout days, when i didnt have any rank, most of the people around me still listened to me and did what i asked them to do where some of those of higher rank couldnt get them to do it. When I got my rank, I rarely had to pull rank on them. scouts as in boy scouts not army scouts mind you.

    Now its still about the same. I cant realy think of any examples now though its kinda late here and I'm going to sleep soon ;)

    but i think we kinda lead more as a friend than anything else.
     
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  5. slant

    slant Ruboobie

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    One of my comments is, if you're leading a large group of people, chances are a lot of them are going to be susceptible to the INFJ emotional context and leadership role. The way that I've seen this personality type lead is in a gentle, quiet and calm way. It's also fueled by what looks to be reason and logic, but often times is the result of an underlying STRONG emotional connection to whatever they are speaking about. For people who are easily persuaded by feeling, INFJ's approach appears to be effective.
     
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  6. Maverick

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    I agree with slant and add that leadership stems from trust plus competence. I think INFJs are very well equipped to lead...especially without the followers even recognizing who the leader is.
     
  7. Wyote

    Wyote Dad of the Ded
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    Yes, I prefer to make a connection on a deep level. If you can hold on to the majority, things run smoothly and those who are not interested or in tune with my emotions simply require clear, direct orders. Knowing who needs what is key. There are a couple of avenues to take for building a connection. For some it's through trust and for others it's through strength. If you demonstrate both you can build repertoire fairly quickly with anyone who actually wants to succeed. The rest can go to hell. Seriously.
     
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  8. Faye

    Faye ^_^
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    Crack the whip! :m071:
     
  9. Duty

    Duty Permanent Fixture

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    As a leader, an INFJ should not get bogged down with being INFJ. Every individual is, of course, going to have their own incentives.

    Projecting confidence and security are always prerequisites to leadership of course, but it's important to identify the incentives that will work for each person. An ESTJ is not going to be motivated by more solo projects and better equipment, but instead with domain (doesn't have to be people) and affiliation/group projects...especially ones they get to control in some aspect.

    Assess what the people around you are going to be motivated by...solo projects vs group work, more power vs more independence from power, rewards for achievement, etc.

    I'm also a big believer in getting people into the right position. An INTP should not be doing data entry...but an ISTJ would be excellent at it. Of course, you have to watch out, because most people, SJs especially, are very status driven and want to be in the prestigious positions...even if they aren't right for them.

    The worst mistake in personnel assignment is what I call the WTBA...Worst Traditional Business Assumption...which is that people that are good at taking orders are going to be good at giving them. WHY would you ever take your steady, dependable, reliable, but not very ambitious superstar "grunt" and expect them to know how to manage? 9 out of 10 times they just continue doing grunt work, and don't at all know how to delegate and train. If assigning "subleaders" don't just assume that your best worker will make the best leader. It's a terrible assumption.


    Lastly is communication. Know that you're an NFJ, and NFJs just believe whatever "makes sense." SJs are going to be a lot of the same way, but what "makes sense" is more narrowly defined. Just remember that a lot of types don't communicate in this fashion. You can't just tell them something and expect them to tell you how great of an idea that is, that it makes sense, and then they implement it. This is especially true if you have people of the NT persuasion under you...they want justification, they want convincing. NTPs will contradict you, but not out of disrespect or because you don't make sense, but to give you their ideas so that you both may discuss the issue with everyone's available data and come to the best conclusion. SPs you're going to make no sense to, they just aren't introspective like INFJs are. Honestly, I have so much trouble communicating with SPs (even ISTPs, who I share a primary function with) that I can't offer a lot of advice here. It always helps to appeal to their senses/fun side obviously...never met an SP that didn't like alcohol or sex for example. Perhaps offer tasty treats for jobs well done?


    The secrets to leadership are just doing a few things, many listed above, here is a consolidated list:

    1. Project confidence, make people feel comfortable/secure, and take responsibility.

    2. Be a democratic leader...ask for peoples' opinions, take consideration of everyone in the group. No one likes an authoritarian leader who makes all the decisions themselves without consideration for others, and no one likes completely "hands-off" leaders...it's like they're not even there.

    3. Put people in the right position. Be aware of the WTBA.

    4. Give people an incentive to succeed, not an incentive to not fail. If the only incentive is to not fail, then they will only do the minimum required, and feel no obligation to go above that (think Office Space, when Peter first talks to the Bobs he tells them that he has 8 bosses...the only incentive he has is to not fail so he is left alone).

    5. Seriously, seriously don't make the next stupid business assumption: "People are naturally lazy and don't like to work." Way too many leaders make this assumption. It's psychologically proven that the vast majority of healthy adults have a psychological requirement to feel productive. People want to feel as if they're part of a worthy cause larger then themselves...they want to have something to go do to fill the time...they want a place they can meet people and have a little corner of society...they want to feel productive. Assume that people want to try their best, they're just looking for a good reason to...you'll get a LOT more out of people working like that.
     
    #9 Duty, Jun 23, 2009
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2009
  10. slant

    slant Ruboobie

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    :eek:
    Now you have.
     
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  11. sassafras

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    I think INFJ's have a quiet charisma; it inspires people to trust them because they speak with conviction and diplomacy and they treat everyone as a part of the whole. I think people would have a hard time resenting their leadership (as sometimes the case may be for more overbearing, heavy handed authority figures) because you get the vibe that these people truly want what is best for the group. Furthermore, any perceived 'shyness' on an INFJ's part tends to go on the backburner when these folks suddenly find themselves having to fight for what they believe to be right.
     
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  12. Koba

    Koba Community Member

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    I am a conciliatory leader. I do not like to take sides against people, and I like to give everyone as much chance as possible to willingly cooperate with me or whatever authority I am representing (although if I feel like I've given them that already I have no problems being very harsh with someone, since I'll generally have gone through more trouble for them than most people would). This means that whenever there's a conflict, which there inevitably will be, both or all sides will often end up mad at me for contradicting part of what they're saying, as I try to bring sides closer together by helping them see things clearly. In many situations this is a great way to end up isolated.

    I have mixed feelings about taking leadership. Generally I only seek it if I feel like have to feel like I have something unique to contribute. I'm more comfortable playing a supporting role, which I suppose can be more amiable to my preferred style of leadership.

    Edit: So to explicitly answer your questions...

    "My question is how would an INFJ leader influence individuals? How would they create incentives?"

    I try to influence individuals by doing whatever I need to do to get their willing cooperation and support. My preferred incentive would be their own desire."

    I don't know if this applies to other people or not. I have not observed INFJ leaders to a large degree.
     
    #12 Koba, Jun 23, 2009
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2009
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