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Age and MBTI

Discussion in 'Psychology and MBTI' started by hush, Nov 27, 2011.

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  1. hush

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    I was just kind of curious about the connection or relationship between the two, if any. At times when I hear people questioning their type, and then others give tentative answers they add that the person in question is young - does this imply being younger makes it more difficult to identify a type because there are too many other factors at play during that transitional period of life (though, it would seem that many stages in life have comparable, though differing effects)? If that not that, could it more so suggest that type changes, if perhaps minutely, over time?

    To sum it up, does age affect MBTI by making one's type unclear, or are there significant enough changes throughout the lifetime that MBTI similarly changes?

    If you have any other musings on the subject of MBTI and age's interrelationship, I would be curious to hear them, too. :]
     
  2. Gaze

    Gaze My word . . . hmm
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    I think at a younger age, it's believed that the true or underlying personality is not fully realised or developed so it's difficult to type. Social and environment influences such as early experiences and peer influences may easily affect how someone's personality develops, making it difficult to recognise the true personality type.

    Personally, I don't think type is easily identifiable at any age because there are so many factors or influences which can shape it's development.
     
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  3. jyrffw54

    jyrffw54 שכינה עוֹלֶה

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    As a general rule, if I mentally type someone who is not related to me, I avoid doing so, if they are under the age of 15-16, and even that is pushing it for me. At the same time, trying to type someone in their 20s, can be difficult, since their third function "spikes" around this age and that can cause confusion. They are also in a phase of something called "Finding themselves" (Not that folks of other ages, don't go through this as well, I just notice more of a personality evolution this time of life)

    Additonally, I agree with [MENTION=1669]Carrie[/MENTION] 's last statement.
     
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  4. This

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    To be honest I think the reason that people plateau in their early 20's as far as personality goes is because many stop learning after they get out of school. I think if you continue to develop yourself you will always keep changing.
     
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  5. NiennaLadyOfTears

    NiennaLadyOfTears Goth Hobbit Lass
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    I think that you can pretty much identify the middle two functions when one is a child, and that the other two functions on the outer sides are developed through environment and interactions. For instance, I have always been a VERY clear NF. But I used to be extroverted as a child, and leaned more toward Perceiving than I do now. As a teenager I became an introvert, and eventually my ENFP mother drove me insane to the point where I ended up realizing I didn't want to be like that and by the time I was around 23 I had become an INFJ.
     
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  6. Sriracha

    Sriracha Not here.
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    I first took this test around age 21 and was an INFJ. About a year ago I took it again and (alas) still am an INFJ. I can tell you without a doubt that age has played a vital role in experiences that help to develop and influence the other functions.
     
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    I'd hazard to guess that age probably changes your enneagram more than your MBTI. However I am of the seemingly unpopular opinion that MBTI and JCF is largely bullshit based on our own perceptions of ourselves and can likely be changed if we have motivation or environmental reasons to do so.
     
  8. Nixie

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    I think age plays a part in the sense that you are capable of being more open and accepting of who you are as you get older. IMO, the need to fit in has diminshed and more deeply ingrained morals/principles are active as you age.

    I think that personality development is an ongoing process but agree that your preferred cognitive functions are beginning to be ingrained and noticeable by about 4. I believe it is why they say children who suffer traumatic experiences at 3-5 can be succeptable to split personality and such disorders (if I am not mistaken).

    I think too, that age will never fully account for an individuals abiility to be more authentic/honest about themselves. It seems that some people are intent to skate on the surface of life and never develop the need/desire to explore the depths of their psyche. It despends on what you value and how willing you are to seek to see more than the shadows on the cave wall. I had a mentor who once told me that I could never go back to being content to sit in front of the tv having a beer because I had a "thought".
     
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  9. the

    the Si master race.
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    The older you get the more ISTJ you become. That is why at a young age people called me more mature than my peers. Its because I accepted my destiny early.
     
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  10. Ryo

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    Totally agree. Social pressures are a big deal for kids/teenagers for pretty important reasons. I think people start to get in touch with their "natural" talents once they have the freedom/opportunity/motivation to do so. That can happen at any age.
     
  11. Norton

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    I'm sixty (I can hardly believe it!) and I've always been an INTP. As I've aged and had more experience, though, I've become more balanced and versatile despite retaining my INTP preferences. At the same time, ironically, I no longer accept being forced to be other than what I am. So, at the same time I'm more of an INTP (and more comfortable with myself) I can be less of an INTP, if necessary. You start to fall apart physically as you get older, e.g., simple injuries become chronic problems. But, in many ways life gets easier. Experience really does count.
     
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