Voluntary Reordering of Cognitive Functions | INFJ Forum

Voluntary Reordering of Cognitive Functions

Discussion in 'The INFJ Typology' started by Exits, Apr 28, 2010.

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  1. Exits

    Exits Newbie

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    I've been fascinated with the "Stress and the INFJ" thread for a while now. It's an interesting idea that our mind will automatically restructure our cognitive function order to deal with a problem. I notice Nobleheart says in that thread that he can sometimes voluntarily flip Ni with Fe.

    In theory, could a person develop and become aware of their cognitive functions to a degree that they could change them to suit a situation based on choice -- forcefully rearrange their preferential ordering of functions based on familiarization and practice? Seems like our brains could be more flexible in this way than I thought?


     
    #1 Exits, Apr 28, 2010
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2010
  2. arbygil

    arbygil Passing through

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    I think it happens unconsciously, but consciously is a different story. Whenever we try to communicate and our communication style isn't working, we'll sometimes try a new tactic. That new tactic usually is a different function being used.

    But to consciously change? That's another story. Because we don't know the other person's communication style until we first speak with them, we'd have to first realize that our current style isn't working - and we'd have to know what *their* cognitive function order is to react or respond to it. I don't know if anyone's quick enough to do that without first knowing that person for a number of years, and then knowing type theory enough to choose a function best suited for the situation. It seems like it would be an extremely tough thing to do (unless you're a licensed counselor and MBTI expert).
     
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