INFJ and Autism | Page 3 | INFJ Forum

INFJ and Autism

Discussion in 'The INFJ Typology' started by TheFoolishOwl, Aug 1, 2011.

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  1. acd

    acd Well-known member

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    This is really interesting and helpful. I hope you stick around and share more perspectives.
     
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  2. Asa

    Asa Resident palindrome

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    Welcome, Ameline. I'm already enjoying your presence here and hope you stick around.

    I notice this, too, and it really bothers me. Instead of trying to understand animal behavior and treat animals in a way that makes sense to the animals, they act to please themselves.
    It is the same with relating to other humans.

    Thank you for giving the above analogies and common errors and relating it to your own situation.

    I don't understand why people argue they know other people better than those people know themselves. (Well, I do think I understand why people are like this, but it is annoying. Haha.)

    I don't think what you are describing is true empathy, but people pantomiming empathy. They are not feeling what the other person feels but imagining how they would feel, which is not the same thing at all. It doesn't mean they do not care when they mess up this way, but we could all learn from listening and you are giving a good example by sharing your own life experiences. So, thank you again.

    This is all relatable. Even if you are "seeing through people" it is hard to know how to react unless you know the person well. Try to take the social cues from them. If they're not discussing it, don't bring it up. In the case of the woman in an abusive relationship, try to form a friendship so your support is there when she needs it, but don't bring up something you sense if she doesn't speak about it unless you know for a fact that she is in danger. Real danger is worth losing a friendship over, but if you wreck the friendship by bringing it up when she is ignoring it, you won't be able to help her when she needs it.

    Yes, it is true. And a lot of the time social rules are not very helpful. Haha.

    This is a good analogy. To an extent we all evaluate others by comparing to self, but I disdain this method when used as a "scientific" method that creates otherism, or skewed data based on self-perception vs "the other", or when we are not aware that self is not the starting point.

    This must be so frustrating at times. Do you have places you can go to just be you, instead of a cat in a dog world? Do you imagine a time in the future when autism is accepted and not considered "other"? I do. I think things may change as autism becomes better understood and more prevalent (with proper diagnoses).
     
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  3. Yollie

    Yollie Newbie

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    I think that any MBTI type can have Asperger's/ASD, but statistically, I've heard that INTX types are the most common.
     
  4. Zola

    Zola Regular Poster

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    The way I see it, Fi causes people to feel sympathy by projecting their own experiences onto others. "I have been in that situation before, and it made me feel like this, so the other person probably feels that way, too." The sympathy is filtered through their own value system. It can elicit strong emotions and a feeling of righteousness that borders on advocacy.

    In contrast, Fe observes without internalizing. It doesn't run through the prism of our own personal experience. It's cool-headed and accurate. This is true empathy.

    Example: When my cat was dying, I used Fi. I judged her by my own viewpoint, thinking she was sad and afraid. Then she caught a baby rabbit and gutted it. Then she caught a squirrel and strangled it to death. She had a good time. At first, I was appalled and angry. Then I realized my error and self-corrected to using Fe. I had been judging her end-of-life experience by human standards. She, herself, in no way felt sad or afraid any more than she felt sorry for that rabbit and squirrel. To be sure, she was sick: she felt tired, hungry, thirsty, nauseated, or sometimes in pain. But the rest of it was my own interpretation. She went out of this life like the hunter and warrior she was.
     
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