Self Monitoring Through Outside Means (Texas Hold Em) | INFJ Forum

Self Monitoring Through Outside Means (Texas Hold Em)

Discussion in 'Psychology and MBTI' started by Naxx, Sep 16, 2009.

Share This Page

More threads by Naxx
  1. Naxx

    Naxx Permanent Fixture

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2008
    Threads:
    82
    Messages:
    974
    Likes Received:
    77
    Trophy Points:
    0
    MBTI:
    ESTP
    Enneagram:
    9w0
    One game that I find myself playing a lot lately is Texas Hold Em poker. It's a game where patience pays off as well as logic and intuition. It's allowed me to see the negative effects when either logic, patience or intuition is out of balance.

    The effectiveness of my decisions are many times greater than if I use the best of patience, logic and intuition. However the balance is not very easily kept as I've come to see. In fact my mind grows tired much quicker trying to maintain the balance.

    This is most likely due to the fact I'm not used to making choices with all 3. Normally I go with intuition and judgments and supplement with facts. However when decisions need to be made on the spot this method lacks effectiveness at times.

    While playing I see how my confidence grows to unrealistic expectations when I start to win (arrogance).

    When I lose to a hand I should have won against I see how the irritation starts to build. As I become more and more aggresive and logic and patience is pushed aside I become self destructive (anger).

    When I bet low even though I have a highly favored hand to lure my opponents when I could have bet big and settled for the pot. Long and behold 2 draws later I am beat (greed).

    I start noticing the patterns, the tell tail signs when these aspects start to impede my judgement of reality and go against my over all sense of goals.

    Because the truth is, if I am making these choices short term with a game I am probably making them long term through out my life. This is why It's important I use various different methods and catch myself before my emotions betray myself and my dreams.

    The first step in trying to solve a problem is indeed realizing it's even exists and what it looks like. Second is to identify the root of the problem, and third start progression to weakening the problem till you can launch a coup de tat for it.

    With that being said this game is teaching me a lot about how to handle risky choices in real life situations. Because in the end of the way all you can do is make the best choice at the time, where it will lead no one really knows till it happens.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
    #1 Naxx, Sep 16, 2009
    Last edited: Sep 16, 2009
  2. Goatman455

    Goatman455 Community Member

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2009
    Threads:
    4
    Messages:
    140
    Likes Received:
    9
    Trophy Points:
    0
    MBTI:
    ENFP

    "I see your argument and raise you patience."

    "All in"

    :m181:


    Seriously though, good post, Texas Hold 'em is great, but I definitely think patience and stamina is the key to the game.
     
  3. Shai Gar

    Shai Gar Guest

    Heh, I've found that nattering and insulting their ability to spell and use grammar is a great way to drive the opponents insane so that I can knock them off their balance and win.
     
  4. Baccal

    Baccal Newbie

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2009
    Threads:
    15
    Messages:
    49
    Likes Received:
    6
    Trophy Points:
    0
    MBTI:
    INFJ
    Hi I have played hold em, actually quite frequently at one stage.

    I agree in part with your summation. Do you mean online or offline though? I am much better offline than on as I can use my Fe to better judge my opponents and hence use my Ni effectively.

    Online you are turning it into a more mathematical game which is not to my strenghts as I hate stats and it becomes impersonal so not really to INFJ strenghts.

    Hope that makes some sense
     
  5. Goatman455

    Goatman455 Community Member

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2009
    Threads:
    4
    Messages:
    140
    Likes Received:
    9
    Trophy Points:
    0
    MBTI:
    ENFP
    " Heh, I've found that nattering and insulting their ability to spell and use grammar is a great way to drive the opponents insane so that I can knock them off their balance and win. "

    Phil is that you?



    Also, for the Fe thing, I think you can be perfectly successful online. I agree real life is easier and more fun, but you really gotta read the opponents bets, not their emotions anyway. Only a crappy poker player let's his/her emotion show, because that would be a huge giveaway.

    I think you can do fine online, just have some confidence and see how they play.
     
  6. Shai Gar

    Shai Gar Guest

    Richard Whereat actually.
     
  7. Goatman455

    Goatman455 Community Member

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2009
    Threads:
    4
    Messages:
    140
    Likes Received:
    9
    Trophy Points:
    0
    MBTI:
    ENFP

    I was only joking, Phil Hellmuth does that all the time, I thought you were referring to him (perhaps you were?)
     
  8. Shai Gar

    Shai Gar Guest

    nope, who's that?
     
  9. Goatman455

    Goatman455 Community Member

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2009
    Threads:
    4
    Messages:
    140
    Likes Received:
    9
    Trophy Points:
    0
    MBTI:
    ENFP

    He is one of the most famous poker players of all time. He has more world series of poker bracelets (11) than any other player.


    I think he is an ENTP actually, albeit an emotional one. His nickname is the "Poker Brat" because he is known for berating opponents when he gets bad like. He really explodes on lesser players who make bad calls, claiming "You can't even spell poker" or "If luck wasn't involved I guess I would win them all".


    I really believe that he is a good guy, but his emotions just get the better of him sometimes. He is really funny too, and also very unorthodox in his play style. I mean, he does things most poker pros consider bad moves, but he makes them work to the point where they are saying "Wow, I like that".

    Still he doesn't get as much respect from his peers as he should because he displays this arrogant side a lot. I also think part of it is the fact he has performed so well, I don't want to call it jealousy, but I think he uses his success in poker to convince himself how good he is, while other players at his skill level don't display this arrogance.

    He is an incredible player with a great feel for the game. I think his greatest asset is that he is always learning and improving despite his arrogance. If people say he can't play with the pros (claiming he can only beat bad players), he goes and plays with them and proves that he has really earned those bracelets for real and that he deserves to be mentioned with the greats.


    Despite his occasional bouts of classlessness (which are great for TV), he is still one of my favorite players, and certainly one of the best of all time, especially at Texas Holdem.
     
  10. Shai Gar

    Shai Gar Guest

    myeh... he seems like a brat, for real and for true.

    he's got a good style of putting people off balance, but he's a c*nt otherwise.
     
Loading...

Share This Page