INFJs and stereotypes | INFJ Forum

INFJs and stereotypes

Discussion in 'The INFJ Typology' started by Solstice, Apr 21, 2009.

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  1. Solstice

    Solstice Regular Poster

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    I wanted to make this topic to see if opposing stereotypes was common for INFJs. I find that being a male INFJ puts me at a serious disadvantage in modern society, but I guess everyone has their own problems. I don't actually like yell at people for making stereotypical comments or anything, but I know for sure if my Fi was just a bit stronger than my Fe I'd lash out at people every day. If only I didn't care so much about hurting their feelings... maybe that's a good thing. :p

    It feels like today everyone is constantly organizing people into groups (maybe the people I know just have a strong Te?) and judging them based on traits either they or society assigns to that group. For some reason it hurts me deeply whenever I see it happening, even when I'm not the one being "grouped." For example, whenever I see someone making an offensive joke towards gay people, I feel offended even though I am straight. The same goes for any group of people even when I don't belong to them. Maybe it has to do with INFJs naturally putting themselves in other people's positions and feeling what they feel?

    I think what frustrates me the most is that, because of Fe, I never say or do anything about it because I don't want to make that person feel guilty. Gender stereotypes are probably the worst for me, because those usually are targetted towards me. Well, people don't literally make fun of me, but they might make fun of a sensitive guy, which hurts me because I tend to be sensitive. Maybe I'm wrong, but I think girls might have it a little easier with stereotypes as far as support goes. If a girl decides she doesn't want to fit the stereotype that girls are weaker than boys and decides to work out, she gets support from other girls for being a strong, independent woman, or that's what I see. However, when a guy is sensitive, it seems that other guys call him a sissy or they just make fun of him. It's really annoying, and even though I'd probably never share my feelings openly anyway (being a private INFJ) I feel like the option isn't even there if I truly wanted to.

    I wish it was possible to just end stereotypes and prejudice altogether, but I'm not sure that's even possible because they're just about everywhere - in TV shows, books, even jokes people laugh at all the time. How do you feel about the topic? Is it just me or an INFJ thing? Maybe even an NF thing?
     
  2. Azure_Knight

    Azure_Knight Community Member

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    I think we naturally put ourselves in the positions of people who are downtrodden and being made fun of. Most of us know from experience that it isn't fair to stereotype people since we don't fit nicely and neatly into a mold society would like to put us in.
     
  3. Little Brother

    Little Brother Regular Poster

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    Re: INFJ and Stereotypes

    At work, I've been called "being on my period" by a fellow co-worker on occasion. She's a strong extraverted type who makes her rounds throughout the office telling jokes, gossiping, being sociable. When she comes to my office space, I don't engage her. I'll say good morning and continue to work. Of course, she speaks anyway. I don't laugh at much of her jokes, and when she gossips, I just listen. I don't have the heart to tell her that I don't like gossiping. I don't want any conflict.

    And BTW, I am male.
     
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