What is the connection between Ni and intelligence? | INFJ Forum

What is the connection between Ni and intelligence?

Discussion in 'Psychology and MBTI' started by Gaze, Aug 12, 2010.

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  1. Gaze

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    Ni is described as a form of intelligence and is also can be used in combination with other intelligences to enhance knowledge and "knowing".


    But what from your perspective, is Ni's relationship to intelligence?


    Or what is Ni's relationship to different types/kinds of intelligence?


    Provide specific examples if you can.
     
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    #1 Gaze, Aug 12, 2010
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  2. Odyne

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    Recognizing patterns and finding connections that might seem unlikely. It gives ground to creativity and fantastic problem-solving skills, I find.
     
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  3. Peppermint

    Peppermint Well-known member

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    It's a very slippery slope to make relations of any functions to intelligence. Both concepts are not very clearly defined, and there are multiple different interpretations.
    The testing methods for both are not exactly very reliable either.

    For what it's worth, some statistics claim that the highest scoring types in regards to IQ are INTJ, INTP, INFJ, INFP in that order.

    http://libertycorner.blogspot.com/2004/03/iq-and-personality.html

    With how shitty MBTI testing is, I wouldn't be surprised if none of that held any ground in relation to types.
     
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    #3 Peppermint, Aug 12, 2010
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  4. Wyote

    Wyote Xenoi
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    Ni in relation to learning is like having a massive wall of information that is just a touch too far away to read clearly. It's all thrown on there randomly, you can't quite see it, but then suddenly that one important piece sticks out and you squint a bit and it becomes readable.

    Edit: Then somebody asks you how you knew that, and you'd like to show them where it was but you've lost your place in that mess of a wall. Plus new stuff has been thrown up there in the last ten seconds, it's impossible to keep track, you don't bother questioning it.
     
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    #4 Wyote, Aug 12, 2010
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  5. VH

    VH Variable Hybrid

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    Ni is an amazing advantage when taking IQ tests that measure intelligence via pattern recognition. Honestly, I think this is the biggest reason it is associated. IQ tests are based on what Ni does.
     
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  6. IndigoSensor

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    I don't think there is any association with functions and intelligence.
     
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  7. Billy

    Billy Contents Under Pressure
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    uhh wrong, VH said it right as well, noticing patterns between data IS a form of intelligence.
     
  8. IndigoSensor

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    Does Ni have the potential to be extremely intelligent? Absolutely. Does it mean that Ni users are going to be intelligent? Not at all. You could come up with a rational argument on how any type has the potential to be intelligent or not intelligent.

    I agree with what VH has said, but just because there is the potential for a type to be intelligent doesn't mean it is going to be. It's possible that the majority of high IQ people are of a certain personality type. However, that does not automatically make them the most intelligent. You would have to look at the entire spread of people through all ranges. In reality there is simply no way to tell. Nevertheless, I do not think that just because you are one personality type, it is going to make you more intelligent. Those two things are largely independent of one another.
     
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  9. Billy

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    Umm not sure what battle you think you're fighting, but I think the question was whats the relationship between Ni and Intelligence, it was stated, you were wrong to say functions arent associated with intelligence... not sure what you're on about now.
     
  10. athenian200

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    It's the last part of the word "intelligence" spelled backwards.

    Ecnegilletni.

    Also, Ni is thought to confer an advantage in recognizing the meaning of novel patterns. This can result in more rapid learning and the ability to connect new knowledge with existing worldviews in order to see the big picture.

    Ni is often predictive of abstract intelligence, which is useful, but not other kinds of intelligence that would tend to be more applicable to everyday situations.

    Education and IQ tests probably focus on abstract intelligence, because it's the type that is most often neglected if people are not pushed to cultivate it.
     
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  11. Odyne

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    Damn! I like that. Good one Athenian. :D
     
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  12. arbygil

    arbygil Passing through

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    I've always argued around the forums that MBTI can't be a matter of IQ intelligence - not really. Fact is, I know some brainy engineers who are ISTJs and some dumb-as-rocks INxx folks. But none of us can say that "if you're an x-type it means you're smart/dumb." Genetics doesn't work that way. It might mean you're more intuitive than others, but there are multiple forms of intelligence and the IQ isn't the sole basis for determining IQ intelligence. Not anymore.

    So, no. I wouldn't use IQ as a measure of MBTI or MBTI as a measure of intelligence. There are a few theories out there that determine multiple types of intelligence, and one of those tests is listed over on http://www.mypersonality.info/. But not all of us can be intelligent in all things - we're not wired that way. And I'm okay with that. :)

    Here's a list of some multiple intelligences below, with descriptions:

    1. Naturalist Intelligence (“Nature Smart”)

    Designates the human ability to discriminate among living things (plants, animals) as well as sensitivity to other features of the natural world (clouds, rock configurations). This ability was clearly of value in our evolutionary past as hunters, gatherers, and farmers; it continues to be central in such roles as botanist or chef. It is also speculated that much of our consumer society exploits the naturalist intelligences, which can be mobilized in the discrimination among cars, sneakers, kinds of makeup, and the like.

    2. Musical Intelligence (“Musical Smart”)


    Musical intelligence is the capacity to discern pitch, rhythm, timbre, and tone. This intelligence enables us to recognize, create, reproduce, and reflect on music, as demonstrated by composers, conductors, musicians, vocalist, and sensitive listeners. Interestingly, there is often an affective connection between music and the emotions; and mathematical and musical intelligences may share common thinking processes. Young adults with this kind of intelligence are usually singing or drumming to themselves. They are usually quite aware of sounds others may miss.

    3. Logical-Mathematical Intelligence (Number/Reasoning Smart)

    Logical-mathematical intelligence is the ability to calculate, quantify, consider propositions and hypotheses, and carry out complete mathematical operations. It enables us to perceive relationships and connections and to use abstract, symbolic thought; sequential reasoning skills; and inductive and deductive thinking patterns. Logical intelligence is usually well developed in mathematicians, scientists, and detectives. Young adults with lots of logical intelligence are interested in patterns, categories, and relationships. They are drawn to arithmetic problems, strategy games and experiments.

    4. Existential Intelligence

    Sensitivity and capacity to tackle deep questions about human existence, such as the meaning of life, why do we die, and how did we get here.

    5. Interpersonal Intelligence (People Smart”)

    Interpersonal intelligence is the ability to understand and interact effectively with others. It involves effective verbal and nonverbal communication, the ability to note distinctions among others, sensitivity to the moods and temperaments of others, and the ability to entertain multiple perspectives. Teachers, social workers, actors, and politicians all exhibit interpersonal intelligence. Young adults with this kind of intelligence are leaders among their peers, are good at communicating, and seem to understand others’ feelings and motives.

    6. Bodily-Kinesthetic Intelligence (“Body Smart”)

    Bodily kinesthetic intelligence is the capacity to manipulate objects and use a variety of physical skills. This intelligence also involves a sense of timing and the perfection of skills through mind–body union. Athletes, dancers, surgeons, and craftspeople exhibit well-developed bodily kinesthetic intelligence.

    7. Linguistic Intelligence (Word Smart)

    Linguistic intelligence is the ability to think in words and to use language to express and appreciate complex meanings. Linguistic intelligence allows us to understand the order and meaning of words and to apply meta-linguistic skills to reflect on our use of language. Linguistic intelligence is the most widely shared human competence and is evident in poets, novelists, journalists, and effective public speakers. Young adults with this kind of intelligence enjoy writing, reading, telling stories or doing crossword puzzles.

    8. Intra-personal Intelligence (Self Smart”)

    Intra-personal intelligence is the capacity to understand oneself and one’s thoughts and feelings, and to use such knowledge in planning and directioning one’s life. Intra-personal intelligence involves not only an appreciation of the self, but also of the human condition. It is evident in psychologist, spiritual leaders, and philosophers. These young adults may be shy. They are very aware of their own feelings and are self-motivated.

    9. Spatial Intelligence (“Picture Smart”)

    Spatial intelligence is the ability to think in three dimensions. Core capacities include mental imagery, spatial reasoning, image manipulation, graphic and artistic skills, and an active imagination. Sailors, pilots, sculptors, painters, and architects all exhibit spatial intelligence. Young adults with this kind of intelligence may be fascinated with mazes or jigsaw puzzles, or spend free time drawing or daydreaming.


    ETA: Link here - http://skyview.vansd.org/lschmidt/Projects/The Nine Types of Intelligence.htm
     
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  13. OP
    Gaze

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    Just a point of note: Nowhere in my question, did it say that intelligence = IQ. And my question has nothing to do with anyone being less or more intelligent based on function or type. The question was meant to be pretty general and open question. I was really just looking for any interesting links someone may notice between Ni and intelligence.
     
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    #13 Gaze, Aug 12, 2010
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2010
  14. arbygil

    arbygil Passing through

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    Exactly - which was why I also opened it by adding multiple types of intelligence. IQ is just one measure people use. :)
     
  15. DoveAlexa

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    Arbygil, are you willing, however, to think there could be a link between which type of intelligence we seem to be strongest in at an early age, and what function we are dominant in? If not, what's missing that makes this theory not work?
     
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  16. arbygil

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    Oh, I'd say yes - we can be born with certain types of skills. But if we don't use those skills, then we tend to become "average" with them as we get older, or at the most usually above average. There are geniuses at every age, and virtuosos in stringed instruments don't need to be math whizzes, and they may not be. Function dominance - as far as MBTI is concerned - usually doesn't show up until much later: http://www.personalitypage.com/html/kid_info.html.

    In other words, age 2-6 we try these functions:

    For very young children (aged 2-6), you can tell:

    1. Extraverted Perceivers (EP)
    2. Introverted Perceivers (IP)
    3. Extraverted Judgers (EJ)
    4. Introverted Judgers (IJ)

    But not the rest.

    The children's aged 7-12 personality categories that [they] recognize coincide with the original personality types identified by Carl Jung, before the types were expanded upon by Katharine Briggs and Isabel Myers. They are as follows:

    1. Extraverted Sensing (ESP) - the future Performers and Doers
    2. Introverted Sensing (ISJ) - the future Nurturers and Duty Fulfillers
    3. Extraverted Intuition (ENP) - the future Inspirers and Visionaries
    4. Introverted Intuition (INJ) - the future Protectors and Scientists
    5. Extraverted Feelers (EFJ) - the future Givers and Caregivers
    6. Introverted Feelers (IFP) - the future Idealists and Artists
    7. Extraverted Thinkers (ETJ) - the future Executives and Guardians
    8. Introverted Thinkers (ITP) - the future Mechanics and Thinkers

    We don't get the complete personality picture until usually mid or late teens, and even then we may still try on personality for size.
     
  17. DoveAlexa

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    Alright back to Ni and intellegence, if we haven't stifled our ability to accept and take in new and contriditory information (contradictory to what we already know, that is), then Ni can make us seem way smarter than we actually are, overall. It's [simplified] just because we become better and better at guessing. However, it is a trait in the underdeveloped Ni to refuse any information past what we absorbed a long time ago, and they will constantly be guessing wrong, making them look dumber than they are, overall.
     
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  18. IndigoSensor

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    That would make sense. Someone who is an INJ child would likely be best at spatial intelligence. Where as an EFJ would likely be best at interpersonal intelligence. Of course, people will deviate from this sometimes, but there would be a trend.

    This is how I see it (which would be the most common strength).

    Ni: Spatial or Extisentnial
    Ne: Spatial
    Fi: Intrapersonal
    Fe: Interpersonal
    Ti: Logical/Mathimatical
    Te: Logical/Mathimatical or interpersonal
    Si: Naturalist or musical
    Se: Bodily/kinestetic or naturalist

    I'm talking about kids (under 12 years old), and this is certainly up for debate. Cause, well, you can't exactly pin all this down, and it will change depending on how you look at it.
     
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  19. Starry Night

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    Ni is a form of intelligence, its able to think outside the box and find solutions outside the box. Imo thats also a reason why many dominant Ni users arent very good at math. Math is all about solving problems in a repetitive way. I would even go so far as to say that many Ni users are too smart to be good at math, they cannot think in the box that math requieres you to think in, thats smart imo.
     
  20. OP
    Gaze

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    Yeah, agree. Seems the most relatable connection to developing competencies.

    So, do you think Ni abstracts the most meaningful piece of information automatically from all the wall of information available, or does it quickly (at a subconscious level) calculate the "truth" by processing all this information at warp speed?

    As a type of intelligence abstract thinking seems to need Ni to perform.

    Interesting way of looking at it. So, you're saying that Ni is constantly taking information from the past along with new information learned in the present - meaning, it's a continuing and unending process integration and interpretation, in order to come up with its "truth"?
     
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