Gender and Computer Science | INFJ Forum

Gender and Computer Science

Discussion in 'Computer Science' started by corvidae, Apr 6, 2010.

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  1. corvidae

    corvidae ohai internets
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  2. GaiaGraha

    GaiaGraha Community Member

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    I would think that it would not be a male or female thing, but would actually be a Thinker and Feeler thing.

    A good friend of mine who I have known for 17 years (since we were 4) is a female majoring in Computer Systems Engineering. She loves the technical part of it, and doesn't give a SH*T about the people part of it. She hates people, really. She is an INTJ and she has a REALLY high T. She refused to do charity work with me even when I told her that it would look good on college applications, because it was a "waste of her time".

    I think the fact that 65% of men are Thinkers, and 35% are Feelers, and 65% of women are Feelers, and 35% of women are Thinkers can account for why people think their research supports gender stereotypes: 2/3 of people do support that stereotype, and people find what they want to find...but that is still over 2 billion people in the world that are being stereotyped incorrectly.

    Another reason genders seem to be able to be so stereotyped is because of socialization. Which I don't have the time to get into now (really must go to bed...gah), but feel free to research yourself. I'll just say that: men are taught to be more independent, and women are taught to be more communal, and so many people end up falling into those roles that they were taught.

    So, even though more males may fit a certain stereotype, it doesn't mean it is because they ARE male, and same goes for women. There are other factors that need to be taken into account. That's just good science.


    What was it about yourself that you thought was "feminine"?
     
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    #2 GaiaGraha, Apr 6, 2010
    Last edited: Apr 6, 2010
  3. Siamese cat

    Siamese cat Madame Cat strikes again

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    Interesting article, it sums some of the things that I could witness and feel myself through studies. I believe that is the reason why in my country in that department we tend to have more women in boss-like positions (who graduated in computer sciences) than in hardcore programming.

    And I think that it extends on other fields of electrical engineering in various ways in my opinion. As far as I'm concerned that way of thinking ( the one that they identified as male way of connecting with the field), solely interested in the machine, is not good in the long run, it lacks bigger picture, and conformes them not to work on themselves in other aeries of life. At my Uni computer science department is filled with guys who fit the description of glasses wearing, greasy long hair weird guy who talks in machine language only, and I refuse to believe that they all inherently are like that, and that the way they identify with their job is good for them as people in the long run.

    At first I thought of going to computer sciences, but I very early felt all the things that girls in that interview are describing regard their very different point of view when it comes to practicing and applying their field, which was the reason that I chose another field completely where programming is used solely as a tool in a very specific way (not connected with helping people as described in the article though) and I'm very pleased with it.

    I'm looking forward to reading other opinions on this subject here.
     
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  4. Jasmine85

    Jasmine85 Regular Poster

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    I've never done any computer science classes, but I see computers in two ways.

    Firstly, I see them as a tool to help us understand the world better. Computers were used to a great extent in most research fields long before we had personal computers. They still are. I do enjoy some of the theory, but deep down my long term motivation is to help improve our world through better understanding it. Understanding gives us the power of prediction, and the power to change our fate.

    Secondly they are a source of leisure. They allow us interact in the here and now. 10 years ago I never imagined that online communities and online communication would grow up to be as mainstream as they have.
     
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