Effects of cultural expectations on typing/cognitive function use | INFJ Forum

Effects of cultural expectations on typing/cognitive function use

Discussion in 'Psychology and MBTI' started by Gaze, Aug 29, 2010.

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  1. Gaze

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    We spend so much time reducing everything to individual preferences that we don't give enough attention to the influence of cultural/social expectations on cognitive function use.


    If a culture enforces Ti from birth as the idea mode of thinking or if a culture rigidly demands that it's citizens suppress Fi in favor of Fe, then individuals with those demeaned functions are not always likely to know that their more developed functions are not their innate preference. If you operate in Ti mode most of the time, and you take a test, you are going to answer questions as someone who is Ti dominant. This can easily rend the results of a personality test invalid, if you natural preference is really Fe.


    Thoughts?
     
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  2. KazeCraven

    KazeCraven Graduated from Typology : May 2011
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    I think that's why people need to explore all sorts of options once they have freedom to do so (usually in college). I think if we really do still have a preference maintained for Fe when we've got a Ti-type behavior, that preference will manifest as soon as we are given an opportunity to do so.

    Also, I think that people who have developed in this way will also be either neurotic or internally worn from the stress of having to develop in such a way. In other words, there will be traces and evidence of psychological scarring if you will.
     
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  3. deadred

    deadred Community Member

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    I'm not sure that the influences from what I would call the "Sociological and Cultural Context" are ever very far away from us. It would seem natural that we have symbiotic relationships everywhere. How much that influence might be might depend upon how self-aware we are as individuals. The less self-aware we are, the more we would be influenced sub-consciously by these interconnections and interactions. We are all lie on different places on the path towards individuation and integration of our personalities. This brings us back to self-awareness again, at least IMO.
     
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    #3 deadred, Aug 29, 2010
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2010
  4. Quinlan

    Quinlan Right the First Time!

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    I suppose if you felt oppressed by an overly Ti or Fe culture then that would point to you not being a Ti or Fe dominant.

    If mbti/jung is about where you get your "energy" being a Ti dominant in an Fe culture you would feel drained by having to live up to the Fe expectations whereas a Fe dominant would feel encouraged/energized in the same environment.

    People growing up in a culture all respond in different ways as they grow up, some respond well and thrive while others reject the dominant culture and move on or develop their own "subcultures" (this could be explained by differences in our "natural" or innate cognitive preferences).
     
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    #4 Quinlan, Aug 29, 2010
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2010
  5. tine

    tine Regular Poster

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    It depends if you let society affect you or not.
     
  6. OP
    Gaze

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    thx for the responses. :)
     
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  7. myst

    myst Community Member

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    I think United States culture emphasizes E too much. How often do you see a help wanted add that asks for someone who's "extroverted" or "outgoing" and how often do you see one for someone who's "introverted"?
     
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  8. arbygil

    arbygil Passing through

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    I'm sorry I missed this question.

    I do think culture can influence MBTI - but what's more interesting is when you transcend that culture. And culture can be small; it could be gender, race, sexual orientation, or what have you. Each culture probably does have a dominant MBTI "personality" which is why if you're not that dominant personality, you tend to stand out like a sore thumb within that group.

    However, I don't think you can be swayed by the personality of a culture to do things you wouldn't normally do. You may know *how* to react, but I don't think that will be your first (or most natural) inclination if you're not normally that culture's personality.
     
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  9. Nighthawk

    Nighthawk Regular Poster

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    I routinely tested ISTJ and then INTJ for many years after I left the military ... the J preference was so thoroughly ingrained in me through years of brainwashing ... er, I mean indoctrination ... oops, I mean training. I feel there are also biases towards extraversion and sensing, at least in the USA. It also seems that men are often stereotyped as T while women are stereotyped as F. I belive that all of these societal "norms" can skew test results. While my I and N were strong enough to overcome these biases, it did take some soul searching to find my P. The T is my only societally "accepted" preference.
     
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