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Thread: Being Bipolar..1675 days ago

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    . Raccoon Love's Avatar
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    Being Bipolar..

    What exactly is a bipolar person? do you consider yourself to be bipolar f so why? do you think this is a common characteristic among INFJ's. I am wondering because I have always thought I suffer from this even though I have never really visited any sort of psychologists, I experience high levels of emotion in which I find myself excited and happy and others where I just feel like nothing is worth living for, I also have ''2 voices'' always arguing back and forth in my head..

    If anyone has been through this, how is it like to be in such condition?



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    Regular Poster Outside's Avatar
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    You might find this article blog interesting:

    Bipolarity

    Wednesday, October 3, 2007

    More on Myers-Brigg, depression and bipolar

    In a recent post about being an INFJ, Susan raised some very interesting questions:
    I’ve often wondered what would happen if all BIPS [people with bipolar disorder] took personality tests. Would we find that we tend to cluster around a few personality types? Are we more sensitive than the population as a whole? Does a high level of sensitivity or introversion require different coping skills? Does it cause more stress? Sometimes I feel that my illness was caused by my sensitivity to life and my inability to find people who see the world the same way.
    Of course, I have no idea, but my guess would be that the answer to each of these questions is "yes". I didn't find much information on the possible connection between temperament types and bipolar disorder or depression, but I did find one interesting article at John McMan's Depression and Bipolar Web.

    Again, without going into the details of the Myers-Briggs type indicator (MBTI), McMan's unscientific study of 100 visitors to his site (nearly all self-reporting diagnoses of depression or bipolar disorder) yielded some interesting trends:

    • 83% of respondents were introverts, as compared with 25% of the general population.
    • 41% of respondents were Idealists (NF) and 23% were Rationals (NT), as compared with only 8% and 7% of the general population, respectively.
    • 31 of the 41 Idealists were INFJs or INFPs. These "mystics" and "dreamers" represented the largest percentage of the study population, but only account for 1% each of the general population.


    McMan concludes that "the nature of depression and the isolation that derives from any type of mental illness strongly influences our tendency to seek comfort in our own inner world." While this may suggest that depression may lead certain people towards introversion. However, I can't help but wonder if it doesn't really work the other way around, namely that the temperament that we are born with influences how we interact with the world around us. That is to say that the natural tendency towards introversion and all that it entails, coupled with a highly fine-tuned intuitive sense, may lead to depression as a by-product of chronic and often overwhelming sensory overload.

    Is it any wonder that people who are highy introverted are growing increasingly distracted and drained by the ever-increasing encroachment of cell phones, e-mails, text messages, and IMs in our daily lives? Should it come as a surprise that people who are highly intuitive to the feelings and energies emanating from the world around them are emotionally drained merely by reading the newspaper or listening to the nightly news or hearing everyone around them moan and complain about how rotten their lives are?

    The fact that we represent such a minute proportion of the general population merely reinforce our feelings of social isolation and may explain our frequent inability to understand others' motives or behaviors, or to be understood by them. All this then brings me back to the age-old chicken-or-egg question: Am I an INFJ because I'm bipolar, or am I bipolar because I'm INFJ? I may never know, but the latter makes more sense to me.

    If you're interested in learning more about MBTI, I've posted some links that I've found helpful in the sidebar.

    Posted by Syd at 9:21 AM
    Labels: bipolar, depression, emotion, Meyers-Brigg, research, symptoms
    You should focus on the characteristics of your very high, lifted swings (e.g. manic or hypomanic episodes). Bipolar disorder is easily confused with unipolar depression (depression). Remember unless you are cyclothyhmic (a rarer, quicker fluctuating form, see bottom for more info.)


    • A distinct mood which is different to the individual's usual non-depressed mood but is in no way psychotic. The hypomanic episode should not severely impair important areas of functioning or require the individual to be hospitalized. The mood experienced is elevated, expansive or irritable and extends continuously over at least four days.
    • The change in mood should be easily observable by others and should not be due to the use of any substance, or the result of some form of general medical condition. If the mood disturbance is elevated or expansive, three of the following additional symptoms should simultaneously be present, if the mood is irritable four of the following additional symptoms should simultaneously be present in the individual:
    • A decreased need for sleep.
    • Pressure to keep talking or significant increase in verbal communication.
    • Trouble concentrating on the simplest of tasks and distractibility.
    • Psychomotor agitation or an increase in goal driven activity.
    • Flight of ideas and thoughts.
    • A significant increase in self esteem or ideas of grandiosity.
    • Excessive involvement in detrimental albeit pleasurable activities.
    Those two voices...are they comprised of thoughts saying, "I shouldn't be this way," as if it is a thought of reason and then another emotionally dramatic voice?

    I have a friend her who is Bipolar, and it is apparent in their behavior.
    (even though they have been taking meds).

    I had considered this as well as I had gone through the above description at least twice, I remember those times I could work on art or any of my goals for endless hours, and had been irritable (though after much thinking I have decided that I may have just been very inspiried). Also, I had outside influences affecting my mood to some extent. Usually, your mood fluctuates independently of outside stimuli.

    Keep in mind Adolesence is a very tough time , and you have been going through oceans of stress recently. I hope this helps.

    Keep those spirits up!


    Manic-Depressive Disorder- extra info
    Last edited by Outside; 27-01-10 at 06:35 AM.
    "...it's brains without hearts have set saint against sinner;
    put gain over gladness and joy under care-
    let's do as an earth which never do wrong does
    (minute by second and most by more)
    -let's touch the sky:
    with and strange(and a true)
    and a climbing fall into far near blue."
    -E.E. Cummings

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    . Raccoon Love's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Outside View Post
    You might find this article blog interesting:

    Bipolarity

    You should focus on the characteristics of your very high, lifted swings (e.g. manic or hypomanic episodes). Bipolar disorder is easily confused with unipolar depression (depression). Remember unless you are cyclothyhmic (a rarer, quicker fluctuating form, see bottom for more info.)



    Those two voices...are they comprised of thoughts saying, "I shouldn't be this way," as if it is a thought of reason and then another emotionally dramatic voice?

    I have a friend her who is Bipolar, and it is apparent in their behavior.
    (even though they have been taking meds).

    Keep in mind Adolesence is a very tough time , and you have been going through oceans of stress recently. I hope this helps.

    Keep those spirits up!

    Manic-Depressive Disorder- extra info
    Thank you for sharing this, well I have experience some of the said symptoms such as lack of sleep, and I have found myself a lot more irritable then usual though I still try to keep my cool. I also have such flights of fantasy and I been unable to concentrate, now I usually don't experience massive increases of self-esteem or aggression, I just feel a sense of extreme euphoria at times and at other times complete depression, though the negative feelings are a lot more common.

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    Registered User #666 Lucifer's Avatar
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    Well gee when my dad was high he'd be able to stay up for three days straight, like I'd walk into the other room at all hrs of the morning and he'd be there obsessively collaging. He'd also have hyper sex drive like he'd sleep with all these models and take pictures of it, he was a bit of a whore, I didn't figure that one out till I was an adult though. I'd also find books of his highlighted because he thought there was some sort of meaning in them. He'd also spend a lot of money on stuff we didn't really need like one time he got the car painted for $400 the problem was we were broke. He seemed to think that the money would take care of itself.

    He said that he first noticed something wrong with him when he was fourteen or maybe it was later :/ he was definitely in his teens. He had asked this girl this girl he liked out
    and she said yes, and he got all skippy and said she was gonna have a great time. Well when he got up to her house he got so depressed he couldn't talk to her all evening. Not scared depressed.

    When he was low well he didn't do much, when he was low, it was hard to get a word out of him. And sometimes he he'd get these diseases and not notice. Like before I was born he had this horrible skin rash that my mom said made him look like an inflated alien. But when they took him to the hospital all he could talk about was his depression. I mean other than that well he'd get so beyond depressed that he couldn't do ANYTHING like not anything what so ever.



    I mean he had bipolar one of course and the only way you are going to know if you see a phsycologist. I strongly suggest that you do but you know a proper diagnosis might take awhile.

    And uh no I don't have bipolar. As far as Mbti types goes I have know idea but I would think that most people with it are intuitive.

    good luck
    Last edited by Lucifer; 27-01-10 at 06:51 AM.

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    I know my older ENFJ has bipolar and boderline personality disorder. Life for her is though, I am very happy though that she has a loving partner (INTP) who understands her and cares for her and that my older INTJ sister is also taking care of her. Unfortunately though her having Bipolar makes it hard for her to do things such as working and move forward in her singing carrer. She feels extremely insecure about herself and is constantly hurting herself.
    I feel sad when I see the scars on her body.
    She is none the less a very caring person whom I love very much and wish all the best for.

    As far as I go;
    I was also at war with myself hearing the two voices at the back of my head, not sleeping for days at a time, my emotions would switch often, I was obsessed with future goals, constanly beating myself up (punching brick walls till my knuckles bleed, eventually leading to wrist problems)felling worthless, not eatting, very obsessive over future goals and plans, could not relax at all, feeling faint and fainting from lack of energy (I was fainting when I was with my psychologist and at school) and having panic attacks at work.

    I have now left my job, and on tricyclic antidepressants. I don't know exactly what I might of been dealing with but I suspect it was unipolar. In my book, just another side effect of being intelligent. However I will need to check with my doc as he never told me when handed me over my prescription.
    Last edited by Matariki; 28-01-10 at 04:00 AM.

    Rip - NeverAmI



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    Community Member myst's Avatar
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    I can identify a bit with the descriptions of bipolar I've read. But, I'm functional as far as keeping a job, getting through school, etc, so I don't worry about whether the diagnosis fits me. I do think the bipolar people I've met seem really cool though.

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    What do you mean, I can change my Usertitle acd's Avatar
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    There is certainly a difference between being an emotional basketcase and being bipolar.

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    dark dreamer anica's Avatar
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    Being Bipolar

    Quote Originally Posted by acd View Post
    There is certainly a difference between being an emotional basketcase and being bipolar.
    True, but sometimes they look and feel very similar.
    Well-behaved women seldom make history.

    ~Laurel Ulrich Thatcher

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    What do you mean, I can change my Usertitle acd's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by anica View Post
    True, but sometimes they look and feel very similar.
    What does bipolar look and feel like? Maybe I'm just cynical because I'm used to people self-diagnosing because they are having a rough patch in life.

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    dark dreamer anica's Avatar
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    Being Bipolar

    Quote Originally Posted by Raccoon Love View Post
    What exactly is a bipolar person?A person who exhibits a certain set of symptoms as defined by the DSM IV (?), though personally I'm beginning to re-evaluate that. do you consider yourself to be bipolar? Yes. If so why? I've been diagnosed no less than four times by four different psychiatrists (I was hard to convince) and I respond well to medication. do you think this is a common characteristic among INFJ's. I think it's possible. I am wondering because I have always thought I suffer from this even though I have never really visited any sort of psychologists, I experience high levels of emotion in which I find myself excited and happy and others where I just feel like nothing is worth living for, I also have ''2 voices'' always arguing back and forth in my head..

    If anyone has been through this, how is it like to be in such condition?
    As long as the voices remain inside your head, they're thoughts. I's when they're outside your head that they're more likely auditory hallucinations. My definition; take it for what it's worth. Outside gave you lots of good info, btw.
    Well-behaved women seldom make history.

    ~Laurel Ulrich Thatcher

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    My bio mom has bipolar disorder. She's been suffering from highs and lows since before I was even born. She's in deep denial about it, so she isn't getting any treatment. It has made me unable to live in the same house with her. My advice is if you're showing some of the symptoms, get help now. See a psychiatrist and tell them everything you've been experiencing.

    I've always been an introvert, ever since I was a small child. When I was about eight years old, I started feeling depressed. It got worse and worse until I finally almost lost my mind and tried to end my life. That's when I started getting help. I've also been diagnosed with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. It is possible that I'm depressed because I'm an INFJ and thus very observant and sensitive, but it's also possible that I'm depressed because of what I've been through and the fact that mental illness runs in my family. It's definitely something to consider, though.

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    dark dreamer anica's Avatar
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    Being Bipolar

    Quote Originally Posted by acd View Post
    What does bipolar look and feel like? Maybe I'm just cynical because I'm used to people self-diagnosing because they are having a rough patch in life.
    I can't speak for others, but before I was diagnosed and started treatment at age 30 (16 years after its onset), life was pretty confusing. The ups were especially self-destructive, though the depressions weren't better; I just had less energy to with which I could wreck my like. I'd be up not sleeping, not eating, overspending, having sex with strangers, etc., feeling generally invincible. Then I'd crash into a depression made worse by all the wreckage I'd created during the mania. Will continue in a minute. I'm gonna time out here...
    Well-behaved women seldom make history.

    ~Laurel Ulrich Thatcher

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    Being Bipolar

    Double post...mea culpa. But to continue to answer your question: I wrecked a lot of friendships with my behaviors and was usually baffled because time in manias goes by in a blur and the events are often blurred as well. Attempted suicide too many times. Never succeeded (I am a survivor). I was a complete drama queen, but the attempts were serious and I had some pretty bad times in hospitals getting my stomach pumped (I always did pills). When I was finally diagnosed, it was a relief to know there was something definite wrong and something I could do bout it. Lithium takes about four weeks to take effect and I really didn't believe it would make a difference--I mean, I thought I was just the way I was--but in a month or so after I started taking it, I slowly gained a sense of peace I couldn't remember feeling since childhood. I didn't feel dopey or anything; I just had more control over my emotions and my actions. I had choices for the first time in years.

    That about covers it for me, I think. If you have any other questions, I'm glad to answer them.
    Well-behaved women seldom make history.

    ~Laurel Ulrich Thatcher

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    Quote Originally Posted by Raccoon Love View Post
    What exactly is a bipolar person? do you consider yourself to be bipolar f so why? do you think this is a common characteristic among INFJ's. I am wondering because I have always thought I suffer from this even though I have never really visited any sort of psychologists, I experience high levels of emotion in which I find myself excited and happy and others where I just feel like nothing is worth living for, I also have ''2 voices'' always arguing back and forth in my head..

    If anyone has been through this, how is it like to be in such condition?
    I have a few 'voices' in my head. I consider them my 'advisors'. Really though, they're just thoughts like anyone else has. I've never sought out psychological help, though I'm sure I could use it at times, even just to have someone to talk to about my past or anything that I can't talk about with anyone else.
    To cope with my feelings, I try to become aware of them if they are coming out too much, or at inappropriate times, and simply try to think logically first, then I deal with my emotions after I've taken into account the logical facts of the situation. It does help, though it's taken my whole life to get this far, and I still need to improve on it.

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    dark dreamer anica's Avatar
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    Being Bipolar

    Addendum: I have had a few episodes of auditory hallucinations, one quite pleasant and not at all scary (just puzzling that my husband lying right next to me couldn't hear the symphony), the others not so much.
    Well-behaved women seldom make history.

    ~Laurel Ulrich Thatcher

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    I have noticed a trend that people who aren't aware of themselves, or those who don't self analyse (with a disorder), tend to afflicted far worse then someone who is. Part of it could be because they often don't try to fix it.

    It brings me to the question if it is possible for one to watch themselves go 'insane'. I have reasoned that it is not very possible. If it is, the person might be able to subvert the effects of the disorder, and be ok.
    It's all elemental

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    . Raccoon Love's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by IndigoSensor View Post
    I have noticed a trend that people who aren't aware of themselves, or those who don't self analyse (with a disorder), tend to afflicted far worse then someone who is. Part of it could be because they often don't try to fix it.

    It brings me to the question if it is possible for one to watch themselves go 'insane'. I have reasoned that it is not very possible. If it is, the person might be able to subvert the effects of the disorder, and be ok.
    Well, I often self-analyze myself to the point that I can sometimes create ''made-up'' disorders on my situation, I research, take multiple assessments all stating that I must have such disorder and since I am naturally paranoid, I take some belief into such results. Sometimes I feel it is just my mind making such hallucinations and other times I really do believe it..I guess it might all be psychological.

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    dark dreamer anica's Avatar
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    Being Bipolar

    Quote Originally Posted by IndigoSensor View Post
    I have noticed a trend that people who aren't aware of themselves, or those who don't self analyse (with a disorder), tend to afflicted far worse then someone who is. Part of it could be because they often don't try to fix it.

    It brings me to the question if it is possible for one to watch themselves go 'insane'. I have reasoned that it is not very possible. If it is, the person might be able to subvert the effects of the disorder, and be ok.
    You may well be right. Certainly I had less self-awareness at 14 when I suffered my first Major Depression, but consider the strength of the emotions--I had almost complete anhedonia; a grey film covered everything. It was extremely confusing and definitely had a deleterious effect on my ability to reason. Manias are even worse. And remember, there was a lot less information available about bipolar or any other mental illness 47 years ago than there is today.I'm a naturally analtical person (probably why law sckool was such a good fit), but I may not always apply that analytical ability to myself.

    As I've learned more about bipolar over the years ad become more aware of symptoms, I've been able to have much more control the effects of the disorder much more efficiently. But when one is in the throes of untreated bipolar, I think insight and self-awareness are very difficult.
    Well-behaved women seldom make history.

    ~Laurel Ulrich Thatcher

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    Quote Originally Posted by forgetblueskies View Post
    My bio mom has bipolar disorder. She's been suffering from highs and lows since before I was even born. She's in deep denial about it, so she isn't getting any treatment. It has made me unable to live in the same house with her.
    I can relate, my sister is the same way. I still live with her though, and she is getting treatment. She's about 50% better than she was before. It's well worth seeking professional help for this disorder.

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    Being Bipolar

    The bottom line is, if you're having symptoms , the earlier you get help the better. The longer the disorder goes untreated, the longer you have to develop bad coping mechanisms. I know you're underage and whether you can receive mental healthcare without your parents' consent depends on your individual state laws. My advice is to seek help as soon as you can.
    Well-behaved women seldom make history.

    ~Laurel Ulrich Thatcher

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